Role played by purinergic receptors on muscle afferents in evoking the exercise pressor reflex

Ramy L. Hanna, Marc P Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The exercise pressor reflex is believed to be evoked, in part, by multiple metabolic stimuli that are generated when blood supply to exercising muscles is inadequate to meet metabolic demand. Recently, ATP, which is a P2 receptor agonist, has been suggested to be one of the metabolic stimuli evoking this reflex. We therefore tested the hypothesis that blockade of P2 receptors within contracting skeletal muscle attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate cats. We found that popliteal arterial injection of pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS; 10 mg/kg), a P2 receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor response to static contraction of the triceps surae muscles. Specifically, the pressor response to contraction before PPADS averaged 36 ± 3 mmHg, whereas afterward it averaged 14 ± 3 mmHg (P < 0.001; n = 19). In addition, PPADS attenuated the pressor response to postcontraction circulatory occlusion (P < 0.01; n = 11). In contrast, popliteal arterial injection of CGS-15943 (250 μg/kg), a P1 receptor antagonist, had no effect on the pressor response to static contraction of the triceps surae muscles. In addition, popliteal arterial injection of PPADS but not CGS-15943 attenuated the pressor response to stretch of the calcaneal (Achilles) tendon. We conclude that P2 receptors on the endings of thin fiber muscle afferents play a role in evoking both the metabolic and mechanoreceptor components of the exercise pressor reflex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1437-1445
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume94
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Purinergic Receptors
Reflex
Muscles
Achilles Tendon
Injections
Mechanoreceptors
Pyridoxal Phosphate
Skeletal Muscle
Cats
Adenosine Triphosphate
Acids
pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid
9-chloro-2-(2-furyl)-(1,2,4)triazolo(1,5-c)quinazolin-5-imine

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Cat
  • Group III afferents
  • Group IV afferents
  • Neural control of the circulation
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Role played by purinergic receptors on muscle afferents in evoking the exercise pressor reflex. / Hanna, Ramy L.; Kaufman, Marc P.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 94, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 1437-1445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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