Role of IgE in the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in sequential infections in vaccinated and nonvaccinated calves.

R. S. Stewart, Laurel J Gershwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

A study was undertaken to evaluate the possible role of IgE in the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection. Fifteen calves were allotted at random to 3 treatment groups. One group of 6 calves was vaccinated with attenuated BRSV vaccine before live-virus challenge exposure, another group of 6 was not vaccinated before challenge exposure, and the remaining 3 calves served as controls (nonvaccinated, nonchallenge exposed). Calves of the 2 experimental groups were exposed to 2 live-virus aerosolizations (challenge exposure) 35 days apart. Histamine and BRSV-specific IgE (BRSV-IgE) concentrations in serum, lung lavage fluid, and nasopharyngeal exudate, as well as clinical signs of disease, were evaluated for 14 days after each challenge exposure. Vaccination before challenge exposure with live BRSV appeared to have little or no effect on the severity of the disease, but did appear to affect disease persistence. A correlation (P less than 0.02) existed between signs of disease and BRSV-IgE concentration measured in lung lavage fluid, but this was only true for vaccinated calves. Although no other correlations were found between clinical signs of disease and IgE concentration, analysis of the results additionally revealed a strong correlation (P less than 0.002) between disease signs and histamine concentration in nasopharyngeal exudate from calves of both experimental groups. Thus, indirect evidence implicated IgE in BRSV infection pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume50
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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