Role of CD38 in TNF-α-induced airway hyperresponsiveness

Alonso G P Guedes, Joseph A. Jude, Jaime Paulin, Hirohito Kita, Frances E. Lund, Mathur S. Kannan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CD38 is involved in normal airway function, IL-13-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and is also regulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. This study aimed to determine whether TNF-α-induced CD38 upregulation in ASM cells contributes to AHR, a hallmark of asthma. We hypothesized that AHR would be attenuated in TNF-α-exposed CD38-deficient (CD38KO) mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Mice (n = 6-8/group) were intranasally challenged with vehicle control or TNF-α (50 ng) once and every other day during 1 or 4 wk. Lung inflammation and AHR, measured by changes in lung resistance after inhaled methacholine, were assessed 24 h following the last challenge. Tracheal rings were incubated with TNF-α (50 ng/ml) to assess contractile changes in the ASM. While a single TNF-α challenge caused no airway inflammation, both multiple-challenge protocols induced equally significant inflammation in CD38KO and WT mice. A single intranasal TNF-α challenge induced AHR in the WT but not in the CD38KO mice, whereas both mice developed AHR after 1 wk of challenges. The AHR was suppressed by extending the challenges for 4 wk in both mice, although to a larger magnitude in the WT than in the CD38KO mice. TNF-α increased ASM contractile properties in tracheal rings from WT but not from CD38KO mice. In conclusion, CD38 contributes to TNF-α-induced AHR after a brief airway exposure to the cytokine, likely by mediating changes in ASM contractile responses, and is associated with greater AHR remission following chronic airway exposure to TNF-α. The mechanisms involved in this remission remain to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Volume294
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Smooth Muscle
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Inflammation
Interleukin-13
Methacholine Chloride
Pneumonia
Up-Regulation
Asthma
Cytokines
Lung

Keywords

  • Tumor necrosis factor-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Role of CD38 in TNF-α-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. / Guedes, Alonso G P; Jude, Joseph A.; Paulin, Jaime; Kita, Hirohito; Lund, Frances E.; Kannan, Mathur S.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Vol. 294, No. 2, 02.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guedes, Alonso G P ; Jude, Joseph A. ; Paulin, Jaime ; Kita, Hirohito ; Lund, Frances E. ; Kannan, Mathur S. / Role of CD38 in TNF-α-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology. 2008 ; Vol. 294, No. 2.
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