Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) model of Helicobacter pylori: Noninvasive detection and derivation of specific-pathogen-free monkeys

Jay V Solnick, Don R. Canfield, Shufang Yang, Julie Parsonnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Development of the rhesus monkey model of Helicobacter pylori has been hampered by problems with serodetection and by the difficulty of identifying specific-pathogen (Helicobacter)-free animals. Our purpose was to determine whether detection could be improved and to determine if pathogen-free monkeys could be derived by nursery rearing. Methods: An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) and a [ 14C]urea breath test were compared to endoscopy to determine H. pylori infection status in rhesus macaques; 18 animals were hand raised in the nursery to determine whether pathogen-free animals could be selected. Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was common in colony-raised young rhesus monkeys and was nearly universal by adulthood. Serodetection, using antigen from rhesus-derived H. pylori strains, was 95% sensitive and 94% specific. The [ 14C]urea breath test was 96% sensitive and 88% specific for detection of chronic Helicobacter infection in rhesus monkeys. Segregation of newborn animals within the first 24 h of life was a reliable method to obtain pathogen-free rhesus monkeys. Conclusion: Isolation of specific-pathogen- free animals, together with better detection methods, may improve the value of the rhesus monkey model for the study of H. pylori pathogenesis, immune response, and vaccine development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-201
Number of pages5
JournalLaboratory Animal Science
Volume49
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999

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Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Helicobacter pylori
Pathogens
Macaca mulatta
Haplorhini
monkeys
Animals
pathogens
Helicobacter Infections
breath tests
Helicobacter
Breath Tests
Nurseries
Urea
specific pathogen-free animals
urea
Endoscopy
infection
Newborn Animals
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) model of Helicobacter pylori : Noninvasive detection and derivation of specific-pathogen-free monkeys. / Solnick, Jay V; Canfield, Don R.; Yang, Shufang; Parsonnet, Julie.

In: Laboratory Animal Science, Vol. 49, No. 2, 1999, p. 197-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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