RGS Expression Level Precisely Regulates the Duration of Rod Photoresponses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) constitute a family of proteins that bind specifically to the activated α subunits of G proteins (Gα-GTP), acting as GTPase activating proteins, or GAPs, for the rate of GTP hydrolysis. In this issue of Neuron, Krispel et al. resolve a long-standing puzzle in phototransduction, establishing that RGS9 "GAPping" of Gtα-GTP is the molecular mechanism underlying the dominant recovery time constant of mouse rod photoreceptors and that a precise level of expression of RGS9 is required for normal photoresponse timing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-393
Number of pages3
JournalNeuron
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 17 2006
Externally publishedYes

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GTP-Binding Protein Regulators
Guanosine Triphosphate
Light Signal Transduction
Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
GTPase-Activating Proteins
GTP-Binding Proteins
Hydrolysis
Neurons
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

RGS Expression Level Precisely Regulates the Duration of Rod Photoresponses. / Pugh Jr, Edward N.

In: Neuron, Vol. 51, No. 4, 17.08.2006, p. 391-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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