Reward-related decision-making in pediatric major depressive disorder: An fMRI study

Erika E. Forbes, J. Christopher May, Greg J. Siegle, Cecile D. Ladouceur, Neal D. Ryan, Cameron S Carter, Boris Birmaher, David A. Axelson, Ronald E. Dahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although reward processing is considered an important part of affective functioning, few studies have investigated reward-related decisions or responses in young people with affective disorders. Depression is postulated to involve decreased activity in reward-related affective systems. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined behavioral and neural responses to reward in young people with depressive disorders using a reward decision-making task. The task involved choices about possible rewards involving varying magnitude and probability of reward. The study design allowed the separation of decision/anticipation and outcome phases of reward processing. Participants were 9-17 years old and had diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD), anxiety disorders, or no history of psychiatric disorder. Results: Participants with MDD exhibited less neural response than control participants in reward-related brain areas during both phases of the task. Group differences did not appear to be a function of anxiety. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were associated with activation in reward-related brain areas. Conclusions: Results suggest that depression involves altered reward processing and underscore the need for further investigation of relations among development, affective disorders, and reward processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1031-1040
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Major Depressive Disorder
Reward
Decision Making
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pediatrics
Depression
Mood Disorders
Anxiety
Brain
Depressive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Psychiatry

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Depression
  • Reward

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Reward-related decision-making in pediatric major depressive disorder : An fMRI study. / Forbes, Erika E.; Christopher May, J.; Siegle, Greg J.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Ryan, Neal D.; Carter, Cameron S; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Dahl, Ronald E.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 47, No. 10, 11.2006, p. 1031-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forbes, EE, Christopher May, J, Siegle, GJ, Ladouceur, CD, Ryan, ND, Carter, CS, Birmaher, B, Axelson, DA & Dahl, RE 2006, 'Reward-related decision-making in pediatric major depressive disorder: An fMRI study', Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, vol. 47, no. 10, pp. 1031-1040. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2006.01673.x
Forbes, Erika E. ; Christopher May, J. ; Siegle, Greg J. ; Ladouceur, Cecile D. ; Ryan, Neal D. ; Carter, Cameron S ; Birmaher, Boris ; Axelson, David A. ; Dahl, Ronald E. / Reward-related decision-making in pediatric major depressive disorder : An fMRI study. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 1031-1040.
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