Reversible deactivation of higher-order posterior parietal areas. I. Alterations of receptive field characteristics in early stages of neocortical processing

Dylan F. Cooke, Adam B. Goldring, Mary K L Baldwin, Gregg H. Recanzone, Arnold Chen, Tingrui Pan, Scott I. Simon, Leah Krubitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Somatosensory processing in the anesthetized macaque monkey was examined by reversibly deactivating posterior parietal areas 5L and 7b and motor/premotor cortex (M1/ PM) with microfluidic thermal regulators developed by our laboratories. We examined changes in receptive field size and configuration for neurons in areas 1 and 2 that occurred during and after cooling deactivation. Together the deactivated fields and areas 1 and 2 form part of a network for reaching and grasping in human and nonhuman primates. Cooling area 7b had a dramatic effect on receptive field size for neurons in areas 1 and 2, while cooling area 5 had moderate effects and cooling M1/PM had little effect. Specifically, cooling discrete locations in 7b resulted in expansions of the receptive fields for neurons in areas 1 and 2 that were greater in magnitude and occurred in a higher proportion of sites than similar changes evoked by cooling the other fields. At some sites, the neural receptive field returned to the precooling configuration within 5–22 min of rewarming, but at other sites changes in receptive fields persisted. These results indicate that there are profound top-down influences on sensory processing of early cortical areas in the somatosensory cortex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2529-2544
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume112
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

Keywords

  • Area 5
  • Area 7b
  • Cortical deactivation
  • Motor cortex
  • Premotor cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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