Reversible deactivation of higher-order posterior parietal areas. II. Alterations in response properties of neurons in areas 1 and 2

Adam B. Goldring, Dylan F. Cooke, Mary K L Baldwin, Gregg H. Recanzone, Adam G. Gordon, Tingrui Pan, Scott I. Simon, Leah Krubitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role that posterior parietal (PPC) and motor cortices play in modulating neural responses in somatosensory areas 1 and 2 was examined with reversible deactivation by transient cooling. Multiunit recordings from neurons in areas 1 and 2 were collected from six anesthetized adult monkeys (Macaca mulatta) before, during, and after reversible deactivation of areas 5L or 7b or motor cortex (M1/PM), while select locations on the hand and forelimb were stimulated. Response changes were quantified as increases and decreases to stimulus-driven activity relative to baseline and analyzed during three recording epochs: during deactivation (“cool”) and at two time points after deactivation (“rewarm 1,” “rewarm 2”). Although the type of response change observed was variable, for neurons at the recording sites tested >90% exhibited a significant change in response during cooling of 7b while cooling area 5L or M1/PM produced a change in 75% and 64% of sites, respectively. These results suggest that regions in the PPC, and to a lesser extent motor cortex, shape the response characteristics of neurons in areas 1 and 2 and that this kind of feedback modulation is necessary for normal somatosensory processing. Furthermore, this modulation appears to happen on a minute-by-minute basis and may serve as the substrate for phenomena such as somatosensory attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2545-2560
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume112
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

Keywords

  • Cortical deactivation
  • Feedback modulation
  • Motor cortex
  • Posterior parietal cortex
  • Premotor cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Goldring, A. B., Cooke, D. F., Baldwin, M. K. L., Recanzone, G. H., Gordon, A. G., Pan, T., Simon, S. I., & Krubitzer, L. (2014). Reversible deactivation of higher-order posterior parietal areas. II. Alterations in response properties of neurons in areas 1 and 2. Journal of Neurophysiology, 112(10), 2545-2560. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00141.2014