Reversibility of developmental retardation following murine fetal zinc deprivation

R. S. Beach, M. Eric Gershwin, L. S. Hurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the effects and reversibility of moderate prenatal zinc deprivation, pregnant mice were fed, beginning on day 7 of gestation, a diet containing either 100 ppm (control) or 5 ppm zinc; pair-fed controls were also studied. Nutritional manipulation was limited to the prenatal period. Zinc-deprived dams had significantly smaller litters than did controls, and postnatal survival was markedly compromised. Progeny of zinc-deprived dams displayed significant growth retardation, as reflected by lower body weight and length than controls, whether ad libitum-fed or pair-fed. Growth of spleen and thymus was affected by zinc deprivation to a significantly greater extent than was growth of heart, kidney or brain. Cross-fostering of control pups to zinc-deprived dams resulted in delayed growth; however, retardation was not as great as that observed in deprived pups allowed to suckle their natural mothers. Cross-fostering of zinc-deprived pups to control dams improved growth of most organs, but did little to improve growth of spleen and, most notably, thymus. Zinc-deprived pups exhibited considerably 'catch up' growth following neonatal zinc repletion, and 6-8 weeks of age, no significant differences between control and deprived offspring were observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1169-1181
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume112
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1982

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Zinc
zinc
mice
pups
Growth
Foster Home Care
Thymus Gland
spleen
Spleen
compensatory growth
repletion
litters (young animals)
body length
growth retardation
heart
Body Weight
kidneys
Mothers
pregnancy
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reversibility of developmental retardation following murine fetal zinc deprivation. / Beach, R. S.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Hurley, L. S.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 112, No. 6, 1982, p. 1169-1181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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