Resuscitation with an intact cord enhances pulmonary vasodilation and ventilation with reduction in systemic oxygen exposure and oxygen load in an asphyxiated preterm ovine model

Praveen Chandrasekharan, Sylvia Gugino, Justin Helman, Carmon Koenigsknecht, Lori Nielsen, Nicole Bradley, Jayasree Nair, Vikash Agrawal, Mausma Bawa, Andreina Mari, Munmun Rawat, Satyan Lakshminrusimha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

(1) Background: Optimal initial oxygen (O2) concentration in preterm neonates is controversial. Our objectives were to compare the effect of delayed cord clamping with ventilation (DCCV) to early cord clamping followed by ventilation (ECCV) on O2 exposure, gas exchange, and hemodynamics in an asphyxiated preterm ovine model. (2) Methods: Asphyxiated preterm lambs (127–128 d) with heart rate <90 bpm were randomly assigned to DCCV or ECCV. In DCCV, positive pressure ventilation (PPV) was initiated with 30–60% O2 and titrated based on preductal saturations (SpO2) with an intact cord for 5 min, followed by clamping. In ECCV, the cord was clamped, and PPV was initiated. (3) Results: Fifteen asphyxiated preterm lambs were randomized to DCCV (N = 7) or ECCV (N = 8). The inspired O2 (40 ± 20% vs. 60 ± 20%, p < 0.05) and oxygen load (520 (IQR 414–530) vs. 775 (IQR 623–868), p-0.03) in the DCCV group were significantly lower than ECCV. Arterial oxygenation and carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels were significantly lower and peak pulmonary blood flow was higher with DCCV. (4) Conclusion: In asphyxiated preterm lambs, resuscitation with an intact cord decreased O2 exposure load improved ventilation with an increase in peak pulmonary blood flow in the first 5 min.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number307
JournalChildren
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Delayed cord clamping
  • Oxygen exposure
  • Preterm neonates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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