Results of a survey regarding perioperative antiseptic practices

Daniel B Eisen, Laurence Warshawski, David Zloty, Rahman Azari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Currently, there are many options available for perioperative antiseptic techniques for cutaneous surgery. However, there is a paucity of scientific evidence available to suggest which techniques are worthwhile and which are not. Objectives: To determine if there is any consensus among dermatologic surgeons as to which perioperative techniques are being used and which are not. Methods: A questionnaire regarding perioperative techniques was mailed to the 641 members of the American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS). Results: Forty-one percent of those queried returned the questionnaire within the allotted time. Surgical caps and booties were the least used antiseptic techniques. Respondents tended to use antiseptic techniques less often for less invasive procedures and more often for more invasive procedures. Few people used surgical caps, surgical gowns, or booties for any procedure. Conclusions: Many traditional perioperative antiseptic techniques are not being performed by respondents. Calculated infection rates are very low for all queried procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-139
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Local Anti-Infective Agents
Surgical Attire
Mohs Surgery
Dermatologic Surgical Procedures
Surveys and Questionnaires
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Results of a survey regarding perioperative antiseptic practices. / Eisen, Daniel B; Warshawski, Laurence; Zloty, David; Azari, Rahman.

In: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 13, No. 3, 2009, p. 134-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eisen, Daniel B ; Warshawski, Laurence ; Zloty, David ; Azari, Rahman. / Results of a survey regarding perioperative antiseptic practices. In: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 134-139.
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