Restoring normal islet mass and function in type 1 diabetes through regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

Nicole A.J. Krentz, Lonnie D. Shea, Mark O. Huising, James A.M. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes is characterised by autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cell mass. With the advent of insulin therapy a century ago, type 1 diabetes changed from a progressive, fatal disease to one that requires lifelong complex self-management. Replacing the lost β-cell mass through transplantation has proven successful, but limited donor supply and need for lifelong immunosuppression restricts widespread use. In this Review, we highlight incremental advances over the past 20 years and remaining challenges in regenerative medicine approaches to restoring β-cell mass and function in type 1 diabetes. We begin by summarising the role of endocrine islets in glucose homoeostasis and how this is altered in disease. We then discuss the potential regenerative capacity of the remaining islet cells and the utility of stem cell-derived β-like cells to restore β-cell function. We conclude with tissue engineering approaches that might improve the engraftment, function, and survival of β-cell replacement therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-724
Number of pages17
JournalThe Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Restoring normal islet mass and function in type 1 diabetes through regenerative medicine and tissue engineering'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this