Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets

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Abstract

A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41% energy, average daily intake: 8018 ± 1247 kJ/day, mean ± SD) and low-fat (LF, 14% energy, average daily intake: 7331 ± 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean ± SD REE was not different between diets (4940 ± 361 vs. 4861 ± 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 ± 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 ± 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 ± 2.3 vs. 3.1 ± 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-191
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
Volume90
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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Newfoundland and Labrador
resting energy expenditure
Fat-Restricted Diet
Labrador Retriever
low fat diet
Body Composition
Energy Metabolism
body composition
Fats
Diet
lipids
diet
average daily intake
fat-free diet
Indirect Calorimetry
calorimeters
dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry
Dietary Fats
Photon Absorptiometry
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets",
abstract = "A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41{\%} energy, average daily intake: 8018 ± 1247 kJ/day, mean ± SD) and low-fat (LF, 14{\%} energy, average daily intake: 7331 ± 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean ± SD REE was not different between diets (4940 ± 361 vs. 4861 ± 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 ± 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 ± 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 ± 2.3 vs. 3.1 ± 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet.",
author = "S. Yoo and Ramsey, {Jon J} and Havel, {Peter J} and Jones, {P. G.} and Fascetti, {Andrea J}",
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T1 - Resting energy expenditure and body composition of Labrador Retrievers fed high fat and low fat diets

AU - Yoo, S.

AU - Ramsey, Jon J

AU - Havel, Peter J

AU - Jones, P. G.

AU - Fascetti, Andrea J

PY - 2006/6

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N2 - A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41% energy, average daily intake: 8018 ± 1247 kJ/day, mean ± SD) and low-fat (LF, 14% energy, average daily intake: 7331 ± 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean ± SD REE was not different between diets (4940 ± 361 vs. 4861 ± 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 ± 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 ± 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 ± 2.3 vs. 3.1 ± 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet.

AB - A high dietary fat intake may be an important environmental factor leading to obesity in some animals. The mechanism could be either an increase in caloric intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure. To test the hypothesis that high fat diets result in decreased resting energy expenditure (REE), we measured REE using indirect calorimetry in 10-adult intact male Labrador Retrievers, eating weight-maintenance high-fat (HF, 41% energy, average daily intake: 8018 ± 1247 kJ/day, mean ± SD) and low-fat (LF, 14% energy, average daily intake: 7331 ± 771 kJ/day) diets for a 30-day period. At the end of each dietary treatment, body composition measurements were performed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean ± SD REE was not different between diets (4940 ± 361 vs. 4861 ± 413 kJ/day on HF and LF diets respectively). Measurements of fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) also did not differ between diets (FFM: 26.8 ± 2.3 kg vs. 26.3 ± 2.5 kg; FM: 3.0 ± 2.3 vs. 3.1 ± 1.5 kg on HF and LF diets respectively). In summary, using a whole body calorimeter, we found no evidence of a decrease in REE or a change in body composition on a HF diet compared with LF diet.

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