Responses of mice to murine coronavirus immunization

A. L. Smith, M. S. de Souza, D. Finzi, Stephen W Barthold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oral and/or intranasal inoculation of susceptible mouse genotypes with the JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-JHM) consistently results in T cell dysfunction as reflected by in vitro proliferative responses to mitogens or allogeneic cells. One approach to examining the mechanism responsible for the observed functional T cell suppression is to determine whether virus replication is required for its induction. To this end, mice were inoculated oronasally with MHV-JHM that was inactivated with short-wave ultraviolet light, betapropiolactone or psoralen. Mice were also inoculated with live MHV-JHM after recovery from homotypic or heterotypic MHV infection. Spleen cells from BALB mice inoculated oronasally with inactivated MHV-JHM yielded extremely variable in vitro proliferative responses after concanavalin A stimulation. MHV-susceptible mice exposed oronasally or intraperitoneally to virus inactivated by any of the minimum effective treatments failed to seroconvert. Immunization with psoralen-treated virus intraperitoneally in Freund's complete adjuvant or oronasally failed to protect from live virus challenge, but survivors had elevated virus-specific serum IgG antibody titers compared to mock-immunized controls at two weeks post-challenge. Spleen cells from mice that were challenged after recovery from homotypic live virus infection did not exhibit the profound in vitro T cell suppression normally observed during the acute stage of primary infection. In contrast, MHV-JHM challenge of mice vaccinated with heterotypic live MHV-S resulted in significantly depressed in vitro T cell function. The combined data suggest that either virus replication or exposure to more concentrated antigen may be required for induction of the dramatic T cell dysfunction that occurs as a consequence of MHV-JHM infection as well as for a detectable MHV-specific humoral response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-52
Number of pages14
JournalArchives of Virology
Volume125
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Murine hepatitis virus
Coronavirus
Immunization
T-Lymphocytes
Viruses
Ficusin
Virus Replication
Spleen
Infection
Radio Waves
Freund's Adjuvant
Virus Diseases
Ultraviolet Rays
Concanavalin A
Mitogens
Immunoglobulin G
Genotype
Antigens
In Vitro Techniques
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Responses of mice to murine coronavirus immunization. / Smith, A. L.; de Souza, M. S.; Finzi, D.; Barthold, Stephen W.

In: Archives of Virology, Vol. 125, No. 1-4, 03.1992, p. 39-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, A. L. ; de Souza, M. S. ; Finzi, D. ; Barthold, Stephen W. / Responses of mice to murine coronavirus immunization. In: Archives of Virology. 1992 ; Vol. 125, No. 1-4. pp. 39-52.
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