Response to intradermal skin testing with four cat allergen preparations in healthy and allergic dogs.

Stephen D White, J. L. Ohman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intradermal skin testing with 4 cat allergens was performed on 40 dogs. The allergens used were a commercial preparation, cat allergen 1, cat pelt extract, and cat serum. Twenty dogs had inhalant allergies (canine atopy) and 20 dogs were healthy. The dogs in these 2 groups were further allotted to groups of dogs with or without exposure to cats. Cat pelt extract was the only allergen that caused a statistically significant (P less than 0.025) difference in the number of positive reactions in healthy vs allergic dogs, with healthy dogs having the greater number of positive reactions. Seven (35%) of the 20 dogs with no known exposure to cats had positive reactions to at least one of the allergens. In dogs that had been exposed to cats, positive reactions developed in twice the number of dogs without clinical signs of canine atopy, compared with those with clinical signs of canine atopy. These data showed that dogs do become sensitized to cat allergen, but that this sensitization may not indicate known exposure to cats or clinical disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1873-1875
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume49
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

allergens
skin (animal)
Allergens
Cats
Dogs
cats
Skin
dogs
testing
atopy
Canidae
furs and pelts
extracts
Hypersensitivity
hypersensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Response to intradermal skin testing with four cat allergen preparations in healthy and allergic dogs. / White, Stephen D; Ohman, J. L.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 49, No. 11, 11.1988, p. 1873-1875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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