Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies

Kenneth H. Wong, Jonathan Tang, Sonja Dieterich, Hui Zhang, Tong Zhou, Kevin Cleary

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory motion can degrade the quality of nuclear medicine images, especially when attempting to identify small abnormalities, make quantitative estimates of activity concentration, or track the time-varying location of a tumor. Thus, we are developing methods for respiratory motion compensation and testing these methods using robotic devices. The testing device is a computer controlled 3-axis motion simulator that can hold activity-filled phantoms or spheres and move them along pre-programmed paths to simulate respiratory motion. The motion of the platform is programmed in advance and can also be monitored using an optical tracking system, thus providing a solid ground truth for the time-dependent activity concentration. Registration between the coordinate space of the PET or SPET scanner and the optical tracker coordinate system is based on a set of common points (mapped out using the motion simulator) that are visible to both systems. We have also used electromagnetic tracking and optical tracking to obtain realistic respiratory motion data from patients and animal models. These data can be transformed into motion simulator paths, thus providing us with breathing patterns that accurately reflect the nonstationary and variable nature of human respiration. The simulator thus provides a highly useful tool for repeatably testing different approaches to motion-compensated image reconstruction or gated acquisition schemes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record
EditorsJ.A. Seibert
Pages2652-2655
Number of pages4
Volume4
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
Event2004 Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference, Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems and the 14th International Workshop on Room Temperature Semiconductor X- and Gamma- Ray Detectors - Rome, Italy
Duration: Oct 16 2004Oct 22 2004

Other

Other2004 Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference, Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems and the 14th International Workshop on Room Temperature Semiconductor X- and Gamma- Ray Detectors
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period10/16/0410/22/04

Fingerprint

Motion compensation
Robotics
Simulators
Testing
Nuclear medicine
Image reconstruction
Tumors
Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Wong, K. H., Tang, J., Dieterich, S., Zhang, H., Zhou, T., & Cleary, K. (2004). Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies. In J. A. Seibert (Ed.), IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (Vol. 4, pp. 2652-2655)

Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies. / Wong, Kenneth H.; Tang, Jonathan; Dieterich, Sonja; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Tong; Cleary, Kevin.

IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. ed. / J.A. Seibert. Vol. 4 2004. p. 2652-2655.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wong, KH, Tang, J, Dieterich, S, Zhang, H, Zhou, T & Cleary, K 2004, Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies. in JA Seibert (ed.), IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. vol. 4, pp. 2652-2655, 2004 Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference, Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems and the 14th International Workshop on Room Temperature Semiconductor X- and Gamma- Ray Detectors, Rome, Italy, 10/16/04.
Wong KH, Tang J, Dieterich S, Zhang H, Zhou T, Cleary K. Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies. In Seibert JA, editor, IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. Vol. 4. 2004. p. 2652-2655
Wong, Kenneth H. ; Tang, Jonathan ; Dieterich, Sonja ; Zhang, Hui ; Zhou, Tong ; Cleary, Kevin. / Respiratory motion compensation studies using a 3D robotic motion simulator and optical/electromagnetic tracking technologies. IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record. editor / J.A. Seibert. Vol. 4 2004. pp. 2652-2655
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