Respiratory Acid–Base Disorders in the Critical Care Unit

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The incidence of respiratory acid–base abnormalities in the critical care unit (CCU) is unknown, although respiratory alkalosis is suspected to be common in this population. Abnormal carbon dioxide tension can have many physiologic effects, and changes in PCO2 may have a significant impact on outcome. Monitoring PCO2 in CCU patients is an important aspect of critical patient assessment, and identification of respiratory acid–base abnormalities can be valuable as a diagnostic tool. Treatment of respiratory acid–base disorders is largely focused on resolution of the primary disease, although mechanical ventilation may be indicated in cases with severe respiratory acidosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-357
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Clinics of North America - Small Animal Practice
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Critical Care
respiratory tract diseases
Respiratory Alkalosis
Respiratory Acidosis
acidosis
Artificial Respiration
Carbon Dioxide
carbon dioxide
incidence
monitoring
Incidence
Population
Therapeutics
alkalosis

Keywords

  • Blood gas
  • Brain injury
  • Oxygenation
  • Potassium
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

Cite this

Respiratory Acid–Base Disorders in the Critical Care Unit. / Hopper, Katrina.

In: Veterinary Clinics of North America - Small Animal Practice, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 351-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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