Repression of CC16 by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure

Lingxiang Zhu, Peter Y P Di, Reen Wu, Kent E Pinkerton, Yin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Club (Clara) Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP, or CC16) is produced mainly by non-ciliated airway epithelial cells including bronchiolar club cells and the change of its expression has been shown to associate with the progress and severity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). In an animal model, the lack of CC16 renders the animal susceptible to the tumorigenic effect of a major CS carcinogen. A recent population-based Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Diseases (TESAOD) has indicated that the low serum CC16 concentration is closely linked with the smoke-related mortality, particularly that driven by the lung cancer. However, the study of CC16 expression in well-defined smoke exposure models has been lacking, and there is no experimental support for the potential causal link between CC16 and CS-induced pathophysiological changes in the lung. In the present study, we have found that airway CC16 expression was significantly repressed in COPD patients, in monkey CS exposure model, and in CS-induced mouse model of COPD. Additionally, the lack of CC16 exacerbated airway inflammation and alveolar loss in the mouse model. Therefore, CC16 may play an important protective role in CS-related diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0116159
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2015

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cigarettes
smoke
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Pulmonary diseases
exposure models
respiratory tract diseases
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
animal models
Animals
Uteroglobin
carcinogens
lung neoplasms
Carcinogens
epidemiological studies
Haplorhini
monkeys
Epidemiologic Studies
Lung Neoplasms
epithelial cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Repression of CC16 by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. / Zhu, Lingxiang; Di, Peter Y P; Wu, Reen; Pinkerton, Kent E; Chen, Yin.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 1, e0116159, 30.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhu, Lingxiang ; Di, Peter Y P ; Wu, Reen ; Pinkerton, Kent E ; Chen, Yin. / Repression of CC16 by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
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