Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

Taichi Noda, Akihisa Takahashi, Natsuko Kondo, Eiichiro Mori, Noritomo Okamoto, Yosuke Nakagawa, Ken Ohnishi, Małgorzata Z. Zdzienicka, Larry H. Thompson, Thomas Helleday, Hideo Asada, Takeo Ohnishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA-/-, FANCC-/-, FANCA-/-C-/-, FANCD2-/- and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical γH2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA-/-, FANCC-/- and FANCA-/-C-/- cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2-/- cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, γH2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-210
Number of pages5
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume404
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cross-link damage
  • DNA repair
  • FANCD1
  • Formaldehyde

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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