Reliability of using reagent test strips to estimate blood urea nitrogen concentration in dogs and cats

Allyson C. Berent, Tsuyoshi Murakami, Richard D. Scroggin, Dori L Borjesson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate the clinical accuracy of reagent test strips used to estimate BUN concentration in dogs and cats. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 116 dogs and 58 cats. Procedure - Blood samples were collected at the time of admission to the hospital. Estimates of BUN concentration obtained with reagent test strips (category 1 [5 to 15 mg/dL], 2 [15 to 26 mg/dL], 3 [30 to 40 mg/dL], or 4 [50 to 80 mg/dL]) were compared with SUN concentrations measured with an automated analyzer. For dogs, category 1 and 2 test strip results were considered a negative result (nonazotemic) and category 3 and 4 test strip results were considered a positive result (azotemic). For cats, category 1, 2, and 3 test strip results were considered a negative result (nonazotemic) and category 4 test strip results were considered a positive result (azotemic). Results - On the basis of SUN concentration, 40 of the 174 (23%) animals (20 dogs and 20 cats) were classified as azotemic. One dog and 2 cats had false-negative test strip results, and 1 dog had a false-positive result. Sensitivity and specificity were 95% (20/21) and 99% (94/95), respectively, for dogs and 87% (13/15) and 100% (43/43), respectively, for cats. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that reagent test strips are a reliable method for rapidly estimating BUN concentrations in dogs and cats. Because test strip results are only semiquantitative and there remains a potential for misclassification, especially in cats, urea nitrogen concentration should ultimately be verified by means of standard chemistry techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1256
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume227
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Reagent Strips
Blood Urea Nitrogen
urea nitrogen
Cats
Dogs
cats
dogs
blood
testing
prospective studies
Urea
Nitrogen
animals
chemistry
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Reliability of using reagent test strips to estimate blood urea nitrogen concentration in dogs and cats. / Berent, Allyson C.; Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Scroggin, Richard D.; Borjesson, Dori L.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 227, No. 8, 15.10.2005, p. 1253-1256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective - To evaluate the clinical accuracy of reagent test strips used to estimate BUN concentration in dogs and cats. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 116 dogs and 58 cats. Procedure - Blood samples were collected at the time of admission to the hospital. Estimates of BUN concentration obtained with reagent test strips (category 1 [5 to 15 mg/dL], 2 [15 to 26 mg/dL], 3 [30 to 40 mg/dL], or 4 [50 to 80 mg/dL]) were compared with SUN concentrations measured with an automated analyzer. For dogs, category 1 and 2 test strip results were considered a negative result (nonazotemic) and category 3 and 4 test strip results were considered a positive result (azotemic). For cats, category 1, 2, and 3 test strip results were considered a negative result (nonazotemic) and category 4 test strip results were considered a positive result (azotemic). Results - On the basis of SUN concentration, 40 of the 174 (23{\%}) animals (20 dogs and 20 cats) were classified as azotemic. One dog and 2 cats had false-negative test strip results, and 1 dog had a false-positive result. Sensitivity and specificity were 95{\%} (20/21) and 99{\%} (94/95), respectively, for dogs and 87{\%} (13/15) and 100{\%} (43/43), respectively, for cats. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that reagent test strips are a reliable method for rapidly estimating BUN concentrations in dogs and cats. Because test strip results are only semiquantitative and there remains a potential for misclassification, especially in cats, urea nitrogen concentration should ultimately be verified by means of standard chemistry techniques.",
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