Reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia in dogs with diabetes mellitus

53 cases (1995-1998)

Carolyn E. Briggs, Richard W Nelson, Edward C Feldman, Denise A. Elliott, Larry A. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: 53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus. Procedure: Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food- withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Results: Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5%, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 μmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume217
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 2000

Fingerprint

diabetes mellitus
clinical examination
blood glucose
Physical Examination
Diabetes Mellitus
History
Dogs
history
Blood Glucose
dogs
insulin
Insulin
Fructosamine
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
blood serum
fasting
Fasting
hemoglobin
Body Weight Changes
body weight changes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{45301aa148b646b689c76af4f64ae43a,
title = "Reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia in dogs with diabetes mellitus: 53 cases (1995-1998)",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: 53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus. Procedure: Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food- withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Results: Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5{\%}, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 μmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.",
author = "Briggs, {Carolyn E.} and Nelson, {Richard W} and Feldman, {Edward C} and Elliott, {Denise A.} and Neal, {Larry A.}",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "217",
pages = "48--53",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia in dogs with diabetes mellitus

T2 - 53 cases (1995-1998)

AU - Briggs, Carolyn E.

AU - Nelson, Richard W

AU - Feldman, Edward C

AU - Elliott, Denise A.

AU - Neal, Larry A.

PY - 2000/7/1

Y1 - 2000/7/1

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: 53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus. Procedure: Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food- withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Results: Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5%, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 μmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: 53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus. Procedure: Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food- withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Results: Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5%, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 μmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034235476&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034235476&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 217

SP - 48

EP - 53

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 1

ER -