Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders

Soledad Romero, Francesc Colom, Ana-Maria Iosif, Nuria Cruz, Isabella Pacchiaroti, Jose Sanchez-Moreno, Eduard Vieta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the association between family history of completed suicide and suicidal behavior and other clinical variables in subjects with bipolar disorder. Method: 374 outpatients aged from 19 to 88 years (mean ± SD age = 41.9 ± 4.1 years) (54.3% female) meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder type I or II or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype, were included in the study. Forty-eight subjects with a family history of completed suicide were compared to 326 subjects without a family history of completed suicide regarding several clinical and demographic variables. The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004. Results: There were no statistically significant demographic differences between bipolar disorder subjects with and without a family history of suicide. Bipolar disorder subjects with a family history of suicide showed higher rates of cluster C personality disorders than subjects without a family history of suicide (14.9% vs. 2.5%, OR = 6.72, 95% CI = 2.31 to 19.51, p < .001). Subjects with a family history of suicide also demonstrated a significantly greater lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts (52.2% vs. 25.5%, OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.7 to 6.0, p < .001). Results remained significant after controlling for all possible interactions. Conclusion: Family history of completed suicide is a significant risk factor associated with suicidal attempts in patients with bipolar disorder. These findings underscore the importance of identifying patients with a family history of suicide in order to provide prompt treatment and careful follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1517-1521
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume68
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Bipolar Disorder
Suicide
Demography
Personality Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Romero, S., Colom, F., Iosif, A-M., Cruz, N., Pacchiaroti, I., Sanchez-Moreno, J., & Vieta, E. (2007). Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 68(10), 1517-1521.

Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders. / Romero, Soledad; Colom, Francesc; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Cruz, Nuria; Pacchiaroti, Isabella; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Vieta, Eduard.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 68, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 1517-1521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romero, S, Colom, F, Iosif, A-M, Cruz, N, Pacchiaroti, I, Sanchez-Moreno, J & Vieta, E 2007, 'Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders', Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 68, no. 10, pp. 1517-1521.
Romero S, Colom F, Iosif A-M, Cruz N, Pacchiaroti I, Sanchez-Moreno J et al. Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;68(10):1517-1521.
Romero, Soledad ; Colom, Francesc ; Iosif, Ana-Maria ; Cruz, Nuria ; Pacchiaroti, Isabella ; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose ; Vieta, Eduard. / Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2007 ; Vol. 68, No. 10. pp. 1517-1521.
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abstract = "Objective: This study examined the association between family history of completed suicide and suicidal behavior and other clinical variables in subjects with bipolar disorder. Method: 374 outpatients aged from 19 to 88 years (mean ± SD age = 41.9 ± 4.1 years) (54.3{\%} female) meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder type I or II or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype, were included in the study. Forty-eight subjects with a family history of completed suicide were compared to 326 subjects without a family history of completed suicide regarding several clinical and demographic variables. The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004. Results: There were no statistically significant demographic differences between bipolar disorder subjects with and without a family history of suicide. Bipolar disorder subjects with a family history of suicide showed higher rates of cluster C personality disorders than subjects without a family history of suicide (14.9{\%} vs. 2.5{\%}, OR = 6.72, 95{\%} CI = 2.31 to 19.51, p < .001). Subjects with a family history of suicide also demonstrated a significantly greater lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts (52.2{\%} vs. 25.5{\%}, OR = 3.19, 95{\%} CI = 1.7 to 6.0, p < .001). Results remained significant after controlling for all possible interactions. Conclusion: Family history of completed suicide is a significant risk factor associated with suicidal attempts in patients with bipolar disorder. These findings underscore the importance of identifying patients with a family history of suicide in order to provide prompt treatment and careful follow-up.",
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