Relationship of past depressive episodes to symptom severity and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia

Richard J Maddock, Cameron S Carter, K. H. Blacker, B. D. Beitman, K. R R Krishnan, J. W. Jefferson, C. P. Lewis, M. R. Liebowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Many investigators have reported that panic disorder (PD) patients with comorbid major depression (MD) have more severe symptoms and a poorer response to treatment than patients with PD alone. It is not known if this is due to a distinct and more serious underlying disorder in these patients or simply a result of the simultaneous presence of the two disorders. Method: Nondepressed patients presenting for treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) were studied before treatment (N = 180) and after 4 weeks of treatment with adinazolam sustained release (N = 89) or placebo (N = 91). Twenty-nine percent (N = 53) of the patients had a past history of MD Symptom severity and treatment outcome were compared in patients with primary, secondary, single, recurrent, or no past MD. Results: There were no consistent differences in symptom severity or treatment outcome in patients with a past history of primary, secondary, or single episode MD compared with patients with no history of MD. However, a small number of patients with history of recurrent MD exhibited consistently greater symptom severity and poorer response to treatment than patients with no history of MD. Conclusion: The greater severity and worse outcome of comorbid PD and MD observed in earlier studies are more likely due to the simultaneous presence of the two disorders than to a more serious and enduring underlying disorder. However, our results suggest that recurrent MD may indicate a more serious condition in patients with PDA. This possibility warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993

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Agoraphobia
Panic Disorder
Depression
Therapeutics
Placebos
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Maddock, R. J., Carter, C. S., Blacker, K. H., Beitman, B. D., Krishnan, K. R. R., Jefferson, J. W., ... Liebowitz, M. R. (1993). Relationship of past depressive episodes to symptom severity and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 54(3), 88-95.

Relationship of past depressive episodes to symptom severity and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia. / Maddock, Richard J; Carter, Cameron S; Blacker, K. H.; Beitman, B. D.; Krishnan, K. R R; Jefferson, J. W.; Lewis, C. P.; Liebowitz, M. R.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 54, No. 3, 1993, p. 88-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maddock, RJ, Carter, CS, Blacker, KH, Beitman, BD, Krishnan, KRR, Jefferson, JW, Lewis, CP & Liebowitz, MR 1993, 'Relationship of past depressive episodes to symptom severity and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia', Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 88-95.
Maddock, Richard J ; Carter, Cameron S ; Blacker, K. H. ; Beitman, B. D. ; Krishnan, K. R R ; Jefferson, J. W. ; Lewis, C. P. ; Liebowitz, M. R. / Relationship of past depressive episodes to symptom severity and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 1993 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 88-95.
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