Relationship management therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder

Jeffrey S Hoch, Richard L. O'Reilly, Judith Carscadden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relationship management therapy allows patients to choose their own treatment. The model requires that patients who engage in or threaten self-harm or aggressive behavior are discharged from the inpatient part of the program for 24 hours. This study compared mean annual outcome rates for the 27 patients who were consecutively enrolled in the relationship management therapy program from 1998 to 2000. Significant reductions were found in restraint, constant nursing observation, self-harm incidents, and inpatient days. These results fill a gap in the literature about a treatment model that one day could be considered a best practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-181
Number of pages3
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume57
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Borderline Personality Disorder
personality disorder
aggressive behavior
management
best practice
Inpatients
incident
nursing
Therapeutics
Practice Guidelines
Nursing
Observation
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Relationship management therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder. / Hoch, Jeffrey S; O'Reilly, Richard L.; Carscadden, Judith.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 57, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 179-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoch, Jeffrey S ; O'Reilly, Richard L. ; Carscadden, Judith. / Relationship management therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder. In: Psychiatric Services. 2006 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 179-181.
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