Relationship between serum leptin immunoreactivity and body fat mass as estimated by use of a novel gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy deuterium dilution method in cats

Robert C. Backus, Peter J Havel, Ronald L. Gingerich, Quinton Rogers

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77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To validate a recently developed commercially available leptin radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use with feline serum and evaluate the relationship between serum leptin concentrations and body fat mass in domestic cats. Animals - 19 sexually intact male specific-pathogen-free domestic cats that weighed 3.8 to 7.1 kg and were 1.1 to 3.5 years old. Procedure - Specificity for feline leptin was evaluated by use of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of serum. Body fat mass was determined by use of the deuterium oxide (D2O) dilution method. Serum water D2O enrichment was measured by use of gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results - Body fat mass and percentage body fat ranged from 0.3 to 2.3 kg and 7.5 to 34.9%, respectively. Serum leptin concentrations were lower in the unfed versus the fed state and ranged between 1.6 and 4.9 ng/ml human equivalent (HE); mean ± SD value was 2.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml HE. Leptin concentrations increased with increasing body fat mass and percentage of body fat. Conclusions-Leptin is in the serum of domestic cats in free (> 78%) and apparently bound forms. The relationship between body fat and serum leptin concentration was similar to that observed in humans and rodents and indicative of a lipostatic role for leptin in cats. Cats that have an overabundance of body fat appear to be less sensitive to the weight-normalizing action of leptin than cats of ideal body condition. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:796-801) From the Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Backus, Rogers) and the Department of Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Havel), University of California, Davis, CA 95616; and Linco Research, St Louis, MO 63301 (Gingerich).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-801
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume61
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2000

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deuterium
Deuterium
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Leptin
leptin
body fat
Adipose Tissue
Cats
Gases
gases
cats
Serum
deuterium oxide
methodology
Felidae
Deuterium Oxide
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
environmental science
Veterinary Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{85dbc36414004f82ae54aa8c8da04ba1,
title = "Relationship between serum leptin immunoreactivity and body fat mass as estimated by use of a novel gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy deuterium dilution method in cats",
abstract = "Objective - To validate a recently developed commercially available leptin radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use with feline serum and evaluate the relationship between serum leptin concentrations and body fat mass in domestic cats. Animals - 19 sexually intact male specific-pathogen-free domestic cats that weighed 3.8 to 7.1 kg and were 1.1 to 3.5 years old. Procedure - Specificity for feline leptin was evaluated by use of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of serum. Body fat mass was determined by use of the deuterium oxide (D2O) dilution method. Serum water D2O enrichment was measured by use of gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results - Body fat mass and percentage body fat ranged from 0.3 to 2.3 kg and 7.5 to 34.9{\%}, respectively. Serum leptin concentrations were lower in the unfed versus the fed state and ranged between 1.6 and 4.9 ng/ml human equivalent (HE); mean ± SD value was 2.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml HE. Leptin concentrations increased with increasing body fat mass and percentage of body fat. Conclusions-Leptin is in the serum of domestic cats in free (> 78{\%}) and apparently bound forms. The relationship between body fat and serum leptin concentration was similar to that observed in humans and rodents and indicative of a lipostatic role for leptin in cats. Cats that have an overabundance of body fat appear to be less sensitive to the weight-normalizing action of leptin than cats of ideal body condition. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:796-801) From the Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Backus, Rogers) and the Department of Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Havel), University of California, Davis, CA 95616; and Linco Research, St Louis, MO 63301 (Gingerich).",
author = "Backus, {Robert C.} and Havel, {Peter J} and Gingerich, {Ronald L.} and Quinton Rogers",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "796--801",
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T1 - Relationship between serum leptin immunoreactivity and body fat mass as estimated by use of a novel gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy deuterium dilution method in cats

AU - Backus, Robert C.

AU - Havel, Peter J

AU - Gingerich, Ronald L.

AU - Rogers, Quinton

PY - 2000/7

Y1 - 2000/7

N2 - Objective - To validate a recently developed commercially available leptin radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use with feline serum and evaluate the relationship between serum leptin concentrations and body fat mass in domestic cats. Animals - 19 sexually intact male specific-pathogen-free domestic cats that weighed 3.8 to 7.1 kg and were 1.1 to 3.5 years old. Procedure - Specificity for feline leptin was evaluated by use of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of serum. Body fat mass was determined by use of the deuterium oxide (D2O) dilution method. Serum water D2O enrichment was measured by use of gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results - Body fat mass and percentage body fat ranged from 0.3 to 2.3 kg and 7.5 to 34.9%, respectively. Serum leptin concentrations were lower in the unfed versus the fed state and ranged between 1.6 and 4.9 ng/ml human equivalent (HE); mean ± SD value was 2.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml HE. Leptin concentrations increased with increasing body fat mass and percentage of body fat. Conclusions-Leptin is in the serum of domestic cats in free (> 78%) and apparently bound forms. The relationship between body fat and serum leptin concentration was similar to that observed in humans and rodents and indicative of a lipostatic role for leptin in cats. Cats that have an overabundance of body fat appear to be less sensitive to the weight-normalizing action of leptin than cats of ideal body condition. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:796-801) From the Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Backus, Rogers) and the Department of Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Havel), University of California, Davis, CA 95616; and Linco Research, St Louis, MO 63301 (Gingerich).

AB - Objective - To validate a recently developed commercially available leptin radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use with feline serum and evaluate the relationship between serum leptin concentrations and body fat mass in domestic cats. Animals - 19 sexually intact male specific-pathogen-free domestic cats that weighed 3.8 to 7.1 kg and were 1.1 to 3.5 years old. Procedure - Specificity for feline leptin was evaluated by use of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of serum. Body fat mass was determined by use of the deuterium oxide (D2O) dilution method. Serum water D2O enrichment was measured by use of gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results - Body fat mass and percentage body fat ranged from 0.3 to 2.3 kg and 7.5 to 34.9%, respectively. Serum leptin concentrations were lower in the unfed versus the fed state and ranged between 1.6 and 4.9 ng/ml human equivalent (HE); mean ± SD value was 2.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml HE. Leptin concentrations increased with increasing body fat mass and percentage of body fat. Conclusions-Leptin is in the serum of domestic cats in free (> 78%) and apparently bound forms. The relationship between body fat and serum leptin concentration was similar to that observed in humans and rodents and indicative of a lipostatic role for leptin in cats. Cats that have an overabundance of body fat appear to be less sensitive to the weight-normalizing action of leptin than cats of ideal body condition. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:796-801) From the Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Backus, Rogers) and the Department of Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Havel), University of California, Davis, CA 95616; and Linco Research, St Louis, MO 63301 (Gingerich).

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