Relationship between insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels in US adolescents: Findings from the 1999-2004 national health and nutrition examination survey

Andrew A. Bremer, Peggy Auinger, Robert S Byrd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the relationship between insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and an-thropometric measurements with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels. Design: A cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. Setting: Nationally representative samples of US adolescents participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during the years 1999-2004. Participants: A total of 6967 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. Main Exposure: Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and physical activity levels. Outcome Measures: Glucose and insulin concentrations, a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, tri-glyceride concentrations, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) percentile for age and sex. Results: Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that increased sugar-sweetened beverage intake was independently associated with increased HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index percentile for age and sex and decreased HDL cholesterol concentrations; alternatively, increased physical activity levels were independently associated with decreased HOMA-IR, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, and triglyceride concentrations and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. Furthermore, low sugar-sweetened beverage intake and high physical activity levels appear to modify each others' effects of decreasing HOMA-IR and triglyc-eride concentrations and increasing high-density lipo-protein cholesterol concentrations. Conclusions: Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels are each independently associated with insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements in adolescents. Moreover, low sugar-sweetened beverage intake and high physical activity levels appear to modify each others' effects on several health-related outcome variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-335
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume163
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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