Relationship Between Hospital Characteristics and Early Adoption of Angiotensin-Receptor/Neprilysin Inhibitor Among Eligible Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure

Nancy Luo, Steven J. Lippmann, Robert J. Mentz, Melissa A. Greiner, Bradley G. Hammill, N. Chantelle Hardy, Warren K. Laskey, Paul A. Heidenreich, Chun Lan Chang, Adrian F. Hernandez, Lesley H. Curtis, Pamela N. Peterson, Gregg C. Fonarow, Emily C. O'Brien

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The angiotensin-receptor/neprilysin inhibitor ( ARNI ) sacubitril/valsartan reduces hospitalization and mortality for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. However, adoption of ARNI into clinical practice has been slow. Factors influencing use of ARNI have not been fully elucidated. Using data from the Get With The Guidelines-Heart Failure registry, Hospital Compare, Dartmouth Atlas, and the American Hospital Association Survey, we sought to identify hospital characteristics associated with patient-level receipt of an ARNI prescription. Methods and Results We analyzed patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction who were eligible for ARNI prescription (ejection fraction≤40%, no contraindications) and hospitalized from October 1, 2015 through December 31, 2016. We used logistic regression to estimate the associations between hospital characteristics and patient ARNI prescription at hospital discharge, accounting for clustering of patients within hospitals using generalized estimating equation methods and adjusting for patient-level covariates. Of 16 674 eligible hospitalizations from 210 hospitals, 1020 patients (6.1%) were prescribed ARNI at discharge. The median hospital-level proportion of patients prescribed ARNI was 3.3% (Q1, Q3: 0%, 12.6%). After adjustment for patient-level covariates, for-profit hospitals had significantly higher odds of ARNI prescription compared with not-for-profit hospitals (odds ratio, 2.53; 95% CI , 1.05-6.10; P=0.04), and hospitals located in the Western United States had lower odds of ARNI prescription compared with those in the Northeast (odds ratio, 0.33; 95% CI , 0.13-0.84; P=0.02). Conclusions Relatively few hospital characteristics were associated with ARNI prescription at hospital discharge, in contrast to what has been observed in early adoption in other disease areas. Additional evaluation of barriers to implementing new evidence into heart failure practice is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e010484
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2019

Keywords

  • early adoption
  • implementation science
  • novel therapy
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Luo, N., Lippmann, S. J., Mentz, R. J., Greiner, M. A., Hammill, B. G., Hardy, N. C., Laskey, W. K., Heidenreich, P. A., Chang, C. L., Hernandez, A. F., Curtis, L. H., Peterson, P. N., Fonarow, G. C., & O'Brien, E. C. (2019). Relationship Between Hospital Characteristics and Early Adoption of Angiotensin-Receptor/Neprilysin Inhibitor Among Eligible Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure. Journal of the American Heart Association, 8(3), e010484. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.010484