Regulation of the immune response by nitric oxide differentially produced by T helper type 1 and T helper type 2 cells

Andrew W. Taylor-Robinson, Foo Y. Liew, Alison Severn, Damo Xu, Stephen J Mcsorley, Paul Garside, Julio Padron, R. Stephen Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

350 Scopus citations

Abstract

The balance between T helper type 1 (Th1) and T helper type 2 (Th2) cells determines the outcome of many important diseases. Using cloned murine T cell lines, evidence is provided that Th1, but not Th2, cells can be activated by specific antigens or a T cell mitogen, concanavalin A, to produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO). Furthermore, NO can inhibit the secretion of interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon-γ by Th1 cells but has no effect on IL-4 production by Th2 cells. Th1 and Th2 cells can, thus, be distinguished by their differential production of and susceptibility to NO. NO exerts a self-regulatory effect on Th1 cells which are implicated in immunopathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)980-984
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Nitric oxide
  • Th1
  • Th2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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