Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents

Jennifer L. McCord, Marc P Kaufman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise is well known to increase mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and ventilation, effects caused, in part, by a reex arising from contracting skeletal muscles. This phenomenon has been named the exercise pressor reex (Mitchell, Kaufman, and Iwamoto 1983) and is thought to relay information to the central nervous system regarding the metabolic state and the mechanical activity of the exercising muscles (Hayes and Kaufman 2001; Kaufman and Forster 1996). The afferent arm of the exercise pressor reex arc is composed of thinly myelinated group III and non-myelinated group IV muscle afferents. Group III afferents primarily transmit information about mechanical stimuli arising in the exercising muscles, whereas the group IV afferents primarily transmit information about metabolic stimuli (Hayes and Kaufman 2001; Kaufman and Forster 1996). Group III and IV muscle afferents are also thought to be activated by nociceptive stimuli and are likely the sole source of pain from skeletal and cardiac muscle. The aim of this account is to correlate what is known about the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reex and to what extent it is evoked by nociceptive versus non-nociceptive stimulation of skeletal muscle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTranslational Pain Research
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Mouse to Man
PublisherCRC Press
Pages283-300
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781439812105
ISBN (Print)9781138116047
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reflex
Muscle
Muscles
Skeletal Muscle
Ventilation
Myocardium
Arterial Pressure
Central Nervous System
Heart Rate
Pain
Neurology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

McCord, J. L., & Kaufman, M. P. (2009). Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents. In Translational Pain Research: From Mouse to Man (pp. 283-300). CRC Press.

Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents. / McCord, Jennifer L.; Kaufman, Marc P.

Translational Pain Research: From Mouse to Man. CRC Press, 2009. p. 283-300.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McCord, JL & Kaufman, MP 2009, Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents. in Translational Pain Research: From Mouse to Man. CRC Press, pp. 283-300.
McCord JL, Kaufman MP. Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents. In Translational Pain Research: From Mouse to Man. CRC Press. 2009. p. 283-300
McCord, Jennifer L. ; Kaufman, Marc P. / Reflex autonomic responses evoked by group III and IV muscle afferents. Translational Pain Research: From Mouse to Man. CRC Press, 2009. pp. 283-300
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