Redefining the role of broca's area in speech

Adeen Flinker, Anna Korzeniewska, Avgusta Y. Shestyuk, Piotr J. Franaszczuk, Nina Dronkers, Robert T. Knight, Nathan E. Crone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For over a century neuroscientists have debated the dynamics by which human cortical language networks allow words to be spoken. Although it is widely accepted that Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus plays an important role in this process, it was not possible, until recently, to detail the timing of its recruitment relative to other language areas, nor how it interacts with these areas during word production. Using direct cortical surface recordings in neurosurgical patients, we studied the evolution of activity in cortical neuronal populations, as well as the Granger causal interactions between them. We found that, during the cued production of words, a temporal cascade of neural activity proceeds from sensory representations of words in temporal cortex to their corresponding articulatory gestures in motor cortex. Broca's area mediates this cascade through reciprocal interactions with temporal and frontal motor regions. Contrary to classic notions of the role of Broca's area in speech, while motor cortex is activated during spoken responses, Broca's area is surprisingly silent. Moreover, when novel strings of articulatory gestures must be produced in response to nonword stimuli, neural activity is enhanced in Broca's area, but not in motor cortex. These unique data provide evidence that Broca's area coordinates the transformation of information across large-scale cortical networks involved in spoken word production. In this role, Broca's area formulates an appropriate articulatory code to be implemented by motor cortex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2871-2875
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2015

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Motor Cortex
Gestures
Language
Temporal Lobe
Broca Area
Prefrontal Cortex
Population

Keywords

  • Broca
  • ECoG
  • Speech

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Flinker, A., Korzeniewska, A., Shestyuk, A. Y., Franaszczuk, P. J., Dronkers, N., Knight, R. T., & Crone, N. E. (2015). Redefining the role of broca's area in speech. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(9), 2871-2875. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1414491112

Redefining the role of broca's area in speech. / Flinker, Adeen; Korzeniewska, Anna; Shestyuk, Avgusta Y.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Dronkers, Nina; Knight, Robert T.; Crone, Nathan E.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 112, No. 9, 03.03.2015, p. 2871-2875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flinker, A, Korzeniewska, A, Shestyuk, AY, Franaszczuk, PJ, Dronkers, N, Knight, RT & Crone, NE 2015, 'Redefining the role of broca's area in speech', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 112, no. 9, pp. 2871-2875. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1414491112
Flinker, Adeen ; Korzeniewska, Anna ; Shestyuk, Avgusta Y. ; Franaszczuk, Piotr J. ; Dronkers, Nina ; Knight, Robert T. ; Crone, Nathan E. / Redefining the role of broca's area in speech. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2015 ; Vol. 112, No. 9. pp. 2871-2875.
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