Recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and cognitive function among older adults with type 1 diabetes: Findings from the Study of Longevity in Diabetes

Mary E. Lacy, Mary E. Lacy, Paola Gilsanz, Chloe W. Eng, Michal S. Beeri, Michal S. Beeri, Andrew J. Karter, Rachel A. Whitmer, Rachel A. Whitmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes. DKA is associated with poorer cognition in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but whether this is the case in older adults with T1D is unknown. Given the increasing life expectancy in T1D, understanding the role of DKA on brain health in older adults is crucial. Research design and methods We examined the association of DKA with cognitive function in 714 older adults with T1D from the Study of Longevity in Diabetes. Participants self-reported lifetime exposure to DKA resulting in hospitalization; DKA was categorized into 0 hospitalization, 1 hospitalization or ≥2 hospitalizations (recurrent DKA). Global and domain-specific cognition (language, executive function/psychomotor speed, episodic memory and simple attention) were assessed. The association of DKA with cognitive function was evaluated via linear and logistic regression models. Results Twenty-eight percent of participants (mean age=67 years; mean age at diagnosis=28 years; average duration of diabetes=39 years) reported a lifetime history of DKA resulting in hospitalization (18.5% single DKA; 9.7% recurrent DKA). In fully adjusted models, those with recurrent DKA had lower global cognitive function (β=-0.13; 95% CI-0.22 to 0.02) and lower scores on the executive function/psychomotor speed domain (β=-0.34; 95% CI-0.51 to 0.17). Individuals with recurrent DKA were also more likely to have the lowest level of cognitive function on the executive function/psychomotor speed domain (defined as 1.5 SD below the population mean; OR=3.26, 95% CI 1.43 to 7.42). Conclusions Among 714 older adults with T1D, recurrent DKA was associated with lower global cognitive function, lower scores on the executive function/psychomotor speed domain and 3.3 times greater risk of having the lowest level of cognitive function in our sample on the executive function/psychomotor speed domain. These findings suggest that recurrent DKA may negatively impact the brain health of older patients with T1D and highlight the importance of DKA prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere001173
JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ageing
  • cognition
  • ketoacidosis
  • type 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and cognitive function among older adults with type 1 diabetes: Findings from the Study of Longevity in Diabetes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this