Receipt of preventive oral health care by U.S. children

A population-based study of the 2005-2008 medical expenditure panel surveys

Colleen E. Huebner, Janice F Bell, Sarah C. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study provides estimates of the annual use of preventive oral health care by U.S. children ages 6 months-17 years. We estimated the annual use of preventive oral health care with data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2005 through 2008 (n = 18,218). Additionally, we tested associations between use of preventive oral health care and predisposing factors, enabling factors and health need within three age groups: young children, school-age children and youth. Overall, 21 % of the sample was reported to have received preventive oral health care in the prior year. More school-age children received preventive care than did young children or youth regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, health status, residence, or family size. Among the youngest children, low parental education and lack of health insurance were associated with lower odds of receiving preventive care. School-age children of racial and ethnic minority groups had a higher odds of receiving preventive care than did non-Hispanic Whites. Youth with special health care needs were less likely to receive care than their peers. Within each age group, use of preventive care increased significantly from 2005 to 2008. In the U.S. there has been an increase in use of pediatric preventive dental care. Continued effort is needed to achieve primary prevention. Outreach and education should include all parents and especially parents with low levels of education, parents of children with special health care needs and those without health insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1582-1590
Number of pages9
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Preventive Health Services
Oral Health
Health Expenditures
Preventive Medicine
Population
Parents
Health Insurance
Education
Causality
Age Groups
Delivery of Health Care
Minority Groups
Dental Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Primary Prevention
Ethnic Groups
Health Status
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Dental care
  • Medical expenditure panel surveys
  • Oral health
  • Oral health need
  • Preventive dental care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Receipt of preventive oral health care by U.S. children : A population-based study of the 2005-2008 medical expenditure panel surveys. / Huebner, Colleen E.; Bell, Janice F; Reed, Sarah C.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 17, No. 9, 11.2013, p. 1582-1590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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