Real-time spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography and investigation of human retinal vessel autoregulation

Bradley A. Bower, Mingtao Zhao, Robert Zawadzki, Joseph A. Izatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigation of the autoregulatory mechanism of human retinal perfusion is conducted with a real-time spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system. Volumetric, time-sequential, and Doppler flow imaging are performed in the inferior arcade region on normal healthy subjects breathing normal room air and 100% oxygen. The real-time Doppler SDOCT system displays fully processed, high-resolution [512 (axial)(1000 (lateral) pixels] B scans at 17 frames/sec in volumetric and time-sequential imaging modes, and also displays fully processed overlaid color Doppler flow images comprising 512 (axial)(500 (lateral) pixels at 6 frames/sec. Data acquired following 5 min of 100% oxygen inhalation is compared with that acquired 5 min postinhalation for four healthy subjects. The average vessel constriction across the population is -16±26% after oxygen inhalation with a dilation of 36±54% after a return to room air. The flow decreases by -6±20% in response to oxygen and in turn increases by 21±28% as flow returns to normal in response to room air. These trends are in agreement with those previously reported using laser Doppler velocimetry to study retinal vessel autoregulation. Doppler flow repeatability data are presented to address the high standard deviations in the measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number041214
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Fingerprint

Retinal Vessels
Optical tomography
Optical Coherence Tomography
vessels
Homeostasis
tomography
Oxygen
Air
rooms
Inhalation
respiration
oxygen
Healthy Volunteers
Pixels
air
Imaging techniques
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
pixels
Constriction
Velocity measurement

Keywords

  • Biomedical optics
  • Doppler effect
  • Laser Doppler velocimetry
  • Ophthalmology
  • Real-time imaging
  • Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Real-time spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography and investigation of human retinal vessel autoregulation. / Bower, Bradley A.; Zhao, Mingtao; Zawadzki, Robert; Izatt, Joseph A.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 12, No. 4, 041214, 01.07.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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