Reactive oxygen species-dependent cell signaling regulates the mosquito immune response to Plasmodium falciparum

Win Surachetpong, Nazzy Pakpour, Kong Wai Cheung, Shirley Luckhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in direct killing of pathogens, increased tissue damage, and regulation of immune signaling pathways in mammalian cells. Available research suggests that analogous phenomena affect the establishment of Plasmodium infection in Anopheles mosquitoes. We have previously shown that provision of human insulin in a blood meal leads to increased ROS levels in Anopheles stephensi. Here, we demonstrate that provision of human insulin significantly increased parasite development in the same mosquito host in a manner that was not consistent with ROS-induced parasite killing or parasite escape through damaged tissue. Rather, our studies demonstrate that ROS are important mediators of both the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling branches of the mosquito insulin signaling cascade. Further, ROS alone can directly activate these signaling pathways and this activation is growth factor specific. Our data, therefore, highlight a novel role for ROS as signaling mediators in the mosquito innate immune response to Plasmodium parasites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-955
Number of pages13
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reactive oxygen species-dependent cell signaling regulates the mosquito immune response to Plasmodium falciparum'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this