Reaction to a dementia diagnosis in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

Brian D. Carpenter, Chengjie Xiong, Emily K. Porensky, Monica M. Lee, Patrick J. Brown, Mary Coats, David K Johnson, John C. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine short-term changes in depression and anxiety after receiving a dementia diagnosis. DESIGN: Pre/post survey design. SETTING: Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety individuals and their companions. MEASUREMENTS: Fifteen-item Geriatric Depression Scale and 20-item "state" version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. RESULTS: Sixty-nine percent of the individuals were diagnosed with dementia; two-thirds of those were in the earliest symptomatic stages of dementia that, in other settings, is considered to represent mild cognitive impairment. No significant changes in depression were noted in individuals or their companions, regardless of diagnostic outcome or dementia severity. Anxiety decreased substantially after diagnostic feedback in most groups. CONCLUSION: Disclosure of a dementia diagnosis does not prompt a catastrophic emotional reaction in most people, even those who are only mildly impaired, and may provide some relief once an explanation for symptoms is known and a treatment plan is developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-412
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Anxiety
Depression
Disclosure
Geriatrics
Cognitive Dysfunction
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Diagnostic disclosure
  • Doctor-patient interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Carpenter, B. D., Xiong, C., Porensky, E. K., Lee, M. M., Brown, P. J., Coats, M., ... Morris, J. C. (2008). Reaction to a dementia diagnosis in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56(3), 405-412. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01600.x

Reaction to a dementia diagnosis in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. / Carpenter, Brian D.; Xiong, Chengjie; Porensky, Emily K.; Lee, Monica M.; Brown, Patrick J.; Coats, Mary; Johnson, David K; Morris, John C.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 56, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 405-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carpenter, Brian D. ; Xiong, Chengjie ; Porensky, Emily K. ; Lee, Monica M. ; Brown, Patrick J. ; Coats, Mary ; Johnson, David K ; Morris, John C. / Reaction to a dementia diagnosis in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2008 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 405-412.
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