Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins

Da Yin, Erich M. Schwarz, Cristel G. Thomas, Rebecca L. Felde, Ian F Korf, Asher D. Cutter, Caitlin M. Schartner, Edward J. Ralston, Barbara J. Meyer, Eric S. Haag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To reveal impacts of sexual mode on genome content, we compared chromosome-scale assemblies of the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis nigoni to its self-fertile sibling species, C. briggsae. C. nigoni's genome resembles that of outcrossing relatives but encodes 31%more protein-coding genes than C. briggsae. C. nigoni genes lacking C. briggsae orthologs were disproportionately small and male-biased in expression.These include the male secreted short (mss) gene family, which encodes sperm surface glycoproteins conserved only in outcrossing species. Sperm frommss-nullmales of outcrossing C. remanei failed to compete with wild-type sperm, despite normal fertility in noncompetitive mating. Restoring mss to C. briggsae males was sufficient to enhance sperm competitiveness.Thus, sex has a pervasive influence on genome content that can be used to identify sperm competition factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-61
Number of pages7
JournalScience
Volume359
Issue number6371
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2018

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Spermatozoa
Genome
Proteins
Caenorhabditis
Membrane Glycoproteins
Genes
Fertility
Chromosomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Yin, D., Schwarz, E. M., Thomas, C. G., Felde, R. L., Korf, I. F., Cutter, A. D., ... Haag, E. S. (2018). Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins. Science, 359(6371), 55-61. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aao0827

Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins. / Yin, Da; Schwarz, Erich M.; Thomas, Cristel G.; Felde, Rebecca L.; Korf, Ian F; Cutter, Asher D.; Schartner, Caitlin M.; Ralston, Edward J.; Meyer, Barbara J.; Haag, Eric S.

In: Science, Vol. 359, No. 6371, 05.01.2018, p. 55-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yin, D, Schwarz, EM, Thomas, CG, Felde, RL, Korf, IF, Cutter, AD, Schartner, CM, Ralston, EJ, Meyer, BJ & Haag, ES 2018, 'Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins', Science, vol. 359, no. 6371, pp. 55-61. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aao0827
Yin, Da ; Schwarz, Erich M. ; Thomas, Cristel G. ; Felde, Rebecca L. ; Korf, Ian F ; Cutter, Asher D. ; Schartner, Caitlin M. ; Ralston, Edward J. ; Meyer, Barbara J. ; Haag, Eric S. / Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins. In: Science. 2018 ; Vol. 359, No. 6371. pp. 55-61.
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