Randomized trial of therapeutic massage for chronic neck pain

Karen J. Sherman, Daniel C. Cherkin, Rene J. Hawkes, Diana L Miglioretti, Richard A. Deyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Little is known about the effectiveness of therapeutic massage, one of the most popular complementary medical treatments for neck pain. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate whether therapeutic massage is more beneficial than a self-care book for patients with chronic neck pain. Methods: Sixty-four such patients were randomized to receive up to 10 massages over 10 weeks or a self-care book. Follow-up telephone interviews after 4, 10, and 26 weeks assessed outcomes including dysfunction and symptoms. Log-binomial regression was used to assess whether there were differences in the percentages of participants with clinically meaningful improvements in dysfunction and symptoms (ie, >5-point improvement on the Neck Disability Index; >30% improvement from baseline on the symptom bothersomeness scale) at each time point. Results: At 10 weeks, more participants randomized to massage experienced clinically significant improvement on the Neck Disability Index [39% vs. 14% of book group; relative risk (RR)=2.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-7.5] and on the symptom bothersomeness scale (55% vs. 25% of book group; RR=2.2; 95% CI, 1.04-4.2). After 26 weeks, massage group members tended to be more likely to report improved function (RR=1.8; 95% CI, 0.97-3.5), but not symptom bothersomeness (RR=1.1; 95% CI, 0.6-2.0). Mean differences between groups were strongest at 4 weeks and not evident by 26 weeks. No serious adverse experiences were reported. Conclusions: This study suggests that massage is safe and may have clinical benefits for treating chronic neck pain at least in the short term. A larger trial is warranted to confirm these results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-238
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Massage
Neck Pain
Chronic Pain
Confidence Intervals
Self Care
Neck
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews

Keywords

  • Chronic neck pain
  • Clinical trial
  • Primary care patients
  • Therapeutic massage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Randomized trial of therapeutic massage for chronic neck pain. / Sherman, Karen J.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Miglioretti, Diana L; Deyo, Richard A.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 25, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 233-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sherman, Karen J. ; Cherkin, Daniel C. ; Hawkes, Rene J. ; Miglioretti, Diana L ; Deyo, Richard A. / Randomized trial of therapeutic massage for chronic neck pain. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2009 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 233-238.
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