Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of baclofen and gabapentin for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence

Keith G. Heinzerling, Steven Shoptaw, James A. Peck, Xiaowei Yang, Juanmei Liu, John Roll, Walter Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To conduct a 16-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of two GABAergic medications, baclofen (20 mg tid) and gabapentin (800 mg tid), for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. Methods: Adults with methamphetamine dependence were randomized to one of three conditions for 16 weeks: baclofen (n = 25), gabapentin (n = 26) or placebo (n = 37). All participants attended clinic thrice weekly to receive study medication and psychosocial counseling, complete study assessments, and provide urine samples. Results: No statistically significant main effects for baclofen or gabapentin in reducing methamphetamine use were observed using a generalized estimating equation (GEE). A significant treatment effect was found in post hoc analyses for baclofen, but not gabapentin, relative to placebo among participants who reported taking a higher percentage of study medication (significant treatment group and medication adherence interaction in GEE model of methamphetamine use). Conclusions: While gabapentin does not appear to be effective in treating methamphetamine dependence, baclofen may have a small treatment effect relative to placebo. Future studies evaluating the effectiveness of baclofen and other GABAergic agents for treatment of methamphetamine may be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-184
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Baclofen
Methamphetamine
medication
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Therapeutics
GABA Agents
counseling
Medication Adherence
gabapentin
Counseling
interaction
Urine
Group

Keywords

  • Baclofen
  • Gabapentin
  • Methamphetamine dependence
  • Randomized clinical trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of baclofen and gabapentin for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. / Heinzerling, Keith G.; Shoptaw, Steven; Peck, James A.; Yang, Xiaowei; Liu, Juanmei; Roll, John; Ling, Walter.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 85, No. 3, 01.12.2006, p. 177-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heinzerling, Keith G. ; Shoptaw, Steven ; Peck, James A. ; Yang, Xiaowei ; Liu, Juanmei ; Roll, John ; Ling, Walter. / Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of baclofen and gabapentin for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2006 ; Vol. 85, No. 3. pp. 177-184.
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