Randomized controlled trial of the effect of daily supplementation with zinc or multiple micronutrients on the morbidity, growth, and micronutrient status of young Peruvian children

Mary E. Penny, R. Margot Marin, Augusto Duran, Janet M. Peerson, Claudio F. Lanata, Bo Lönnerdal, Robert E. Black, Kenneth H. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Zinc supplements reduce childhood morbidity in populations in whom zinc deficiency is common. In such populations, deficiencies in other micronutrients may also occur. Objective: The objective was to determine whether the administration of other micronutrients with zinc modifies the effect of zinc supplementation on children's morbidity and physical growth. Design: Two hundred forty-six children aged 6-35 mo with persistent diarrhea were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to receive a daily supplement of 10 mg Zn alone (Zn; n = 81), zinc plus vitamins and other minerals at 1-2 times recommended daily intakes (Zn+VM; n = 82), or placebo (n = 83) for ≈6 mo after the diarrhea episode ended. Morbidity information was collected on weekdays. Weight, length, and other anthropometric indicators were measured monthly, and plasma zinc and other indicators of micronutrient status were measured at baseline and 6 mo. Results: Supplement consumption was high (≈90%) in all groups, although slightly more vomiting was reported in the Zn+VM group (P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The change in plasma zinc from baseline to 6 mo was greater in the 2 zinc groups (6.1, 27.3, and 16.2 μg/dL in the placebo, Zn, and Zn+VM groups, respectively; P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The Zn group had fewer episodes of diarrhea, dysentery, and respiratory illness and a lower prevalence of fever and cough than did the Zn+VM group and a lower prevalence of cough than did the placebo group (P = 0.05). No significant effects of supplementation on growth were observed. Conclusion: Morbidity was greater after supplementation with zinc plus multivitamins and minerals than it was after supplementation with zinc alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-465
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

Micronutrients
dietary minerals
morbidity
Zinc
Randomized Controlled Trials
zinc
Morbidity
Growth
placebos
Diarrhea
diarrhea
cough
Placebos
Cough
Minerals
Analysis of Variance
analysis of variance
minerals
dysentery
Recommended Dietary Allowances

Keywords

  • Diarrhea
  • Growth
  • Respiratory infection
  • Zinc deficiency
  • Zinc supplementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Randomized controlled trial of the effect of daily supplementation with zinc or multiple micronutrients on the morbidity, growth, and micronutrient status of young Peruvian children. / Penny, Mary E.; Marin, R. Margot; Duran, Augusto; Peerson, Janet M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Black, Robert E.; Brown, Kenneth H.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 79, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 457-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Penny, Mary E. ; Marin, R. Margot ; Duran, Augusto ; Peerson, Janet M. ; Lanata, Claudio F. ; Lönnerdal, Bo ; Black, Robert E. ; Brown, Kenneth H. / Randomized controlled trial of the effect of daily supplementation with zinc or multiple micronutrients on the morbidity, growth, and micronutrient status of young Peruvian children. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2004 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 457-465.
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AU - Duran, Augusto

AU - Peerson, Janet M.

AU - Lanata, Claudio F.

AU - Lönnerdal, Bo

AU - Black, Robert E.

AU - Brown, Kenneth H.

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N2 - Background: Zinc supplements reduce childhood morbidity in populations in whom zinc deficiency is common. In such populations, deficiencies in other micronutrients may also occur. Objective: The objective was to determine whether the administration of other micronutrients with zinc modifies the effect of zinc supplementation on children's morbidity and physical growth. Design: Two hundred forty-six children aged 6-35 mo with persistent diarrhea were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to receive a daily supplement of 10 mg Zn alone (Zn; n = 81), zinc plus vitamins and other minerals at 1-2 times recommended daily intakes (Zn+VM; n = 82), or placebo (n = 83) for ≈6 mo after the diarrhea episode ended. Morbidity information was collected on weekdays. Weight, length, and other anthropometric indicators were measured monthly, and plasma zinc and other indicators of micronutrient status were measured at baseline and 6 mo. Results: Supplement consumption was high (≈90%) in all groups, although slightly more vomiting was reported in the Zn+VM group (P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The change in plasma zinc from baseline to 6 mo was greater in the 2 zinc groups (6.1, 27.3, and 16.2 μg/dL in the placebo, Zn, and Zn+VM groups, respectively; P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The Zn group had fewer episodes of diarrhea, dysentery, and respiratory illness and a lower prevalence of fever and cough than did the Zn+VM group and a lower prevalence of cough than did the placebo group (P = 0.05). No significant effects of supplementation on growth were observed. Conclusion: Morbidity was greater after supplementation with zinc plus multivitamins and minerals than it was after supplementation with zinc alone.

AB - Background: Zinc supplements reduce childhood morbidity in populations in whom zinc deficiency is common. In such populations, deficiencies in other micronutrients may also occur. Objective: The objective was to determine whether the administration of other micronutrients with zinc modifies the effect of zinc supplementation on children's morbidity and physical growth. Design: Two hundred forty-six children aged 6-35 mo with persistent diarrhea were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to receive a daily supplement of 10 mg Zn alone (Zn; n = 81), zinc plus vitamins and other minerals at 1-2 times recommended daily intakes (Zn+VM; n = 82), or placebo (n = 83) for ≈6 mo after the diarrhea episode ended. Morbidity information was collected on weekdays. Weight, length, and other anthropometric indicators were measured monthly, and plasma zinc and other indicators of micronutrient status were measured at baseline and 6 mo. Results: Supplement consumption was high (≈90%) in all groups, although slightly more vomiting was reported in the Zn+VM group (P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The change in plasma zinc from baseline to 6 mo was greater in the 2 zinc groups (6.1, 27.3, and 16.2 μg/dL in the placebo, Zn, and Zn+VM groups, respectively; P < 0.0001, analysis of variance). The Zn group had fewer episodes of diarrhea, dysentery, and respiratory illness and a lower prevalence of fever and cough than did the Zn+VM group and a lower prevalence of cough than did the placebo group (P = 0.05). No significant effects of supplementation on growth were observed. Conclusion: Morbidity was greater after supplementation with zinc plus multivitamins and minerals than it was after supplementation with zinc alone.

KW - Diarrhea

KW - Growth

KW - Respiratory infection

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KW - Zinc supplementation

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