Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC)

Christopher M. Gordon, William F. Pearman, J. Chance Carter, James W Chan, S. Michael Angel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Raman analysis of common, non-absorbing gases was performed using an 18@1 fiber-optic probe coupled to a multi-pass capillary cell (MCC) for signal enhancement. The MCC is fabricated by metal-coating, using silver or other highly reflective metals, the inside of a 1-2 mm diameter glass capillary using commercially available silvering solutions and provides enhancements up to 30-fold over measurements using the fiber-optic probe alone. The design of the MCC is simple and the device is easy to incorporate into an experimental setup making it suitable for remote and in-situ analysis. Although the MCC is functionally similar to liquid-core waveguides that have been previously described in the literature, the MCC is not based on total internal reflection and so the refractive index of the analyte is not important to the operation of the device. The principle of operation of the MCC is similar to mirror-based multiple pass Raman cells, however, the MCC is not expensive, alignment is trivial and an optical path length up to several meters in length is possible. With our first-generation silver-coated MCCs, limits of detection were determined to be 0.02% and 0.2% for CH4 and CO2 respectively. In this talk we will discuss optimization of the MCC and issues involved in its use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7061
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventNovel Optical Systems Design and Optimization XI - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 10 2008Aug 14 2008

Other

OtherNovel Optical Systems Design and Optimization XI
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/10/088/14/08

Fingerprint

Raman
Silver
Fiber optics
Gases
Metal coatings
Cell
cells
gases
Refractive index
Mirrors
Waveguides
Metals
Glass
Liquids
Fiber Optics
fiber optics
Probe
Enhancement
silver
Gas

Keywords

  • Raman scattering
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • Waveguides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Gordon, C. M., Pearman, W. F., Carter, J. C., Chan, J. W., & Michael Angel, S. (2008). Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC). In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 7061). [70610L] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.795586

Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC). / Gordon, Christopher M.; Pearman, William F.; Carter, J. Chance; Chan, James W; Michael Angel, S.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7061 2008. 70610L.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gordon, CM, Pearman, WF, Carter, JC, Chan, JW & Michael Angel, S 2008, Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC). in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 7061, 70610L, Novel Optical Systems Design and Optimization XI, San Diego, CA, United States, 8/10/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.795586
Gordon CM, Pearman WF, Carter JC, Chan JW, Michael Angel S. Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC). In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7061. 2008. 70610L https://doi.org/10.1117/12.795586
Gordon, Christopher M. ; Pearman, William F. ; Carter, J. Chance ; Chan, James W ; Michael Angel, S. / Raman Analysis of Common Gases Using a Multi-Pass Capillary Cell (MCC). Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7061 2008.
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