Radiologists' online identities

What patients find when they search radiologists by name

Arvind Vijayasarathi, Thomas W Loehfelm, Richard Duszak, C. Matthew Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Patients are increasingly seeking online information regarding their health and their health care providers. Concurrently, more patients are accessing their electronic medical records, including their radiology reports, via online portals. Thus, this study aims to characterize what patients fnd when they search for radiologists online. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All Medicare-participating U.S. radiologists were identifed using the Physician Compare National Downloadable File dataset obtained from the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Using a custom application, the top 10 Google search results for each radiologist in the national dataset were retrieved, and 90.5% of website domains with more than one occurrence were categorized as follows: physician or institution controlled, third party-controlled physician information systems, social media, or other. Aggregate and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS. Of all U.S. health care providers recognized by CMS, 30,601 self-identifed as radiologists. There was at least one search result for 30,600 radiologists (99.997%), for a total of 305,795 websites. Of all the domains, 69.8% were third party-controlled physician information systems, 17.7% were physician or institution controlled, 1.0% were social media platforms, 2.1% were other, and 9.5% were not classifed. Nine of the top 10 most commonly encountered domains were commercially controlled third-party physician information systems. CONCLUSION. Most U.S. radiologists lack self-controlled online content within the frst page of Google search results. Opportunities exist for individual radiologists, radiology groups, academic departments, and professional societies to amend their online presence, control the content patients discover, and improve the visibility of the feld at large.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)952-958
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume207
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Names
Physicians
Information Systems
Social Media
Medicare
Radiology
Health Personnel
Electronic Health Records
Medicaid
Radiologists
Health

Keywords

  • Online presence
  • Patient outreach
  • Physician rating sites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Radiologists' online identities : What patients find when they search radiologists by name. / Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Duszak, Richard; Matthew Hawkins, C.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 207, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 952-958.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vijayasarathi, Arvind ; Loehfelm, Thomas W ; Duszak, Richard ; Matthew Hawkins, C. / Radiologists' online identities : What patients find when they search radiologists by name. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2016 ; Vol. 207, No. 5. pp. 952-958.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. Patients are increasingly seeking online information regarding their health and their health care providers. Concurrently, more patients are accessing their electronic medical records, including their radiology reports, via online portals. Thus, this study aims to characterize what patients fnd when they search for radiologists online. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All Medicare-participating U.S. radiologists were identifed using the Physician Compare National Downloadable File dataset obtained from the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Using a custom application, the top 10 Google search results for each radiologist in the national dataset were retrieved, and 90.5{\%} of website domains with more than one occurrence were categorized as follows: physician or institution controlled, third party-controlled physician information systems, social media, or other. Aggregate and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS. Of all U.S. health care providers recognized by CMS, 30,601 self-identifed as radiologists. There was at least one search result for 30,600 radiologists (99.997{\%}), for a total of 305,795 websites. Of all the domains, 69.8{\%} were third party-controlled physician information systems, 17.7{\%} were physician or institution controlled, 1.0{\%} were social media platforms, 2.1{\%} were other, and 9.5{\%} were not classifed. Nine of the top 10 most commonly encountered domains were commercially controlled third-party physician information systems. CONCLUSION. Most U.S. radiologists lack self-controlled online content within the frst page of Google search results. Opportunities exist for individual radiologists, radiology groups, academic departments, and professional societies to amend their online presence, control the content patients discover, and improve the visibility of the feld at large.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE. Patients are increasingly seeking online information regarding their health and their health care providers. Concurrently, more patients are accessing their electronic medical records, including their radiology reports, via online portals. Thus, this study aims to characterize what patients fnd when they search for radiologists online. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All Medicare-participating U.S. radiologists were identifed using the Physician Compare National Downloadable File dataset obtained from the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Using a custom application, the top 10 Google search results for each radiologist in the national dataset were retrieved, and 90.5% of website domains with more than one occurrence were categorized as follows: physician or institution controlled, third party-controlled physician information systems, social media, or other. Aggregate and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS. Of all U.S. health care providers recognized by CMS, 30,601 self-identifed as radiologists. There was at least one search result for 30,600 radiologists (99.997%), for a total of 305,795 websites. Of all the domains, 69.8% were third party-controlled physician information systems, 17.7% were physician or institution controlled, 1.0% were social media platforms, 2.1% were other, and 9.5% were not classifed. Nine of the top 10 most commonly encountered domains were commercially controlled third-party physician information systems. CONCLUSION. Most U.S. radiologists lack self-controlled online content within the frst page of Google search results. Opportunities exist for individual radiologists, radiology groups, academic departments, and professional societies to amend their online presence, control the content patients discover, and improve the visibility of the feld at large.

AB - OBJECTIVE. Patients are increasingly seeking online information regarding their health and their health care providers. Concurrently, more patients are accessing their electronic medical records, including their radiology reports, via online portals. Thus, this study aims to characterize what patients fnd when they search for radiologists online. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All Medicare-participating U.S. radiologists were identifed using the Physician Compare National Downloadable File dataset obtained from the Centers for Medicare &Medicaid Services (CMS). Using a custom application, the top 10 Google search results for each radiologist in the national dataset were retrieved, and 90.5% of website domains with more than one occurrence were categorized as follows: physician or institution controlled, third party-controlled physician information systems, social media, or other. Aggregate and subgroup analyses were performed. RESULTS. Of all U.S. health care providers recognized by CMS, 30,601 self-identifed as radiologists. There was at least one search result for 30,600 radiologists (99.997%), for a total of 305,795 websites. Of all the domains, 69.8% were third party-controlled physician information systems, 17.7% were physician or institution controlled, 1.0% were social media platforms, 2.1% were other, and 9.5% were not classifed. Nine of the top 10 most commonly encountered domains were commercially controlled third-party physician information systems. CONCLUSION. Most U.S. radiologists lack self-controlled online content within the frst page of Google search results. Opportunities exist for individual radiologists, radiology groups, academic departments, and professional societies to amend their online presence, control the content patients discover, and improve the visibility of the feld at large.

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