Radiographic, high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of the distal portion of the tarsus in weanling, young and adult horses.

S. Laverty, Susan M Stover, D. Bélanger, T. R. O'Brien, R. R. Pool, John Pascoe, K. Taylor, T. Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinical radiographic (LM and D35L-P1MO views), high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of the distal portion of the tarsus of 16 horses (five weanling, four young and six adult), without known clinical histories, were evaluated to determine the sensitivity of clinical radiographs for the detection of abnormalities in the distal tarsus and the prevalence of abnormalities in this population. Clinical radiographic and high detail radiographic abnormalities were observed in at least 30 per cent of the tarsi examined. Statistical agreement between observations from clinical radiographs and corresponding post mortem high detail radiographs was not good for subchondral bone plate irregularities and joint margin changes. Three patterns of sclerosis of the medullary spongiosa were visualised on high detail radiographs: thickening of the subchondral bone plate was seen commonly in the weanling group, whereas arching and bridging patterns were more prevalent in the young and adult groups. Bone production on the dorsal cortex of the central and third tarsal bones did not increase with age. Abnormalities in vascular perfusion and articular cartilage histology were observed in association with subchondral bone plate irregularities and focal regions of osteopenia observed on high detail radiographs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-421
Number of pages9
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume23
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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