Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment

J. Bostwick, Thomas R Stevenson, F. Nahai, T. R. Hester, J. J. Coleman, M. J. Jurkiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Major complications of radiation directed to the breast, axilla, and mediastinum were treated in 54 patients from 1974 to 1983. A classification of these complications facilitates both an understanding of the pattern of injury and the development of a treatment plan. Classification: I. Breast necrosis; II. Radionecrosis and Chest Wall Ulceration; III. Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis with Median Sternotomy Wound Failure After Coronary Revascularization; IV. Brachial Plexus Pain and Paresis; V. Lymphedema and Axillary Cicatrix; VI. Radiation-induced Neoplasia. The treatment has evolved during the 10-year study period to excision of the necrotic wound, including any tumor, and closure wtih a transposed muscle or musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi (II, III, V) or rectus abdominis (I, II, VI). This strategy reflects a change from primary use of the omentum during the first years of the study. The vascularity, oxygen and antibiotic delivery of these muscle and musculocutaneous flaps promote wound healing, usually with one operation. The transfer of these muscles has not caused significant functional deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-553
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume200
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myocutaneous Flap
Breast
Radiation
Muscles
Wounds and Injuries
Rectus Abdominis
Axilla
Omentum
Sternotomy
Lymphedema
Superficial Back Muscles
Brachial Plexus
Mediastinum
Thoracic Wall
Paresis
Wound Healing
Cicatrix
Coronary Artery Disease
Neoplasms
Necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Bostwick, J., Stevenson, T. R., Nahai, F., Hester, T. R., Coleman, J. J., & Jurkiewicz, M. J. (1984). Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment. Annals of Surgery, 200(4), 543-553.

Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment. / Bostwick, J.; Stevenson, Thomas R; Nahai, F.; Hester, T. R.; Coleman, J. J.; Jurkiewicz, M. J.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 200, No. 4, 1984, p. 543-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bostwick, J, Stevenson, TR, Nahai, F, Hester, TR, Coleman, JJ & Jurkiewicz, MJ 1984, 'Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment', Annals of Surgery, vol. 200, no. 4, pp. 543-553.
Bostwick J, Stevenson TR, Nahai F, Hester TR, Coleman JJ, Jurkiewicz MJ. Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment. Annals of Surgery. 1984;200(4):543-553.
Bostwick, J. ; Stevenson, Thomas R ; Nahai, F. ; Hester, T. R. ; Coleman, J. J. ; Jurkiewicz, M. J. / Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment. In: Annals of Surgery. 1984 ; Vol. 200, No. 4. pp. 543-553.
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