Racial factors cannot explain superior Japanese outcomes in stomach cancer

Scott A Hundahl, Grant N. Stemmermann, Andrew Oishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To compare the stage-stratified survival of Japanese patients treated in Honolulu according to Western techniques with that of Japanese patients treated in Tokyo according to Japanese techniques, thus eliminating race as a potentially confounding variable. Design and Patients: Of 312 Honolulu Japanese patients surviving Western-type gastric resection for neoplasm between 1974 and 1985, 279 were identified with invasive gastric adenocarcinoma unassociated with any second malignancy. This Honolulu cohort, treated by Western methods, was retrospectively compared with a similar, previously described cohort of 3176 Tokyo Japanese patients treated according to Japanese methods. Main Outcome Measures: American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Centre le Cancer criteria for stage-stratified survival. Results: Despite non-TNM prognostic factors favoring higher survival for the Honolulu Japanese patients, for every TNM stage, we observed higher survival for the Tokyo Japanese patients who were treated according to Japanese techniques. For stage I disease, the survival rates we re 86% vs 96%, respectively (P<.001); for stage II, 69% vs 77% (P=.15); for stage III, 21% vs 49% (P<.001); and for stage IV, 4% vs 14% (P<.001). Conclusions: Because all patients in this study are Japanese, race-related factors or the 'different-disease' hypothesis cannot explain these results. Lymphadenectomy- related stage-migration and/or differing therapeutic efficacy seem more likely explanations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-175
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume131
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Stomach Neoplasms
Tokyo
Survival
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Second Primary Neoplasms
Lymph Node Excision
Neoplasms
Stomach
Adenocarcinoma
Survival Rate
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Racial factors cannot explain superior Japanese outcomes in stomach cancer. / Hundahl, Scott A; Stemmermann, Grant N.; Oishi, Andrew.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 131, No. 2, 02.1996, p. 170-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hundahl, SA, Stemmermann, GN & Oishi, A 1996, 'Racial factors cannot explain superior Japanese outcomes in stomach cancer', Archives of Surgery, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 170-175.
Hundahl, Scott A ; Stemmermann, Grant N. ; Oishi, Andrew. / Racial factors cannot explain superior Japanese outcomes in stomach cancer. In: Archives of Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 131, No. 2. pp. 170-175.
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