Racial differences in biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women with 3 T MR-based T2 relaxation time measurements - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

A. Yu, U. Heilmeier, M. Kretzschmar, G. B. Joseph, F. Liu, H. Liebl, C. E. McCulloch, M. C. Nevitt, Nancy E Lane, T. M. Link

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether knee cartilage composition differs between African-American and Caucasian-American women at risk for Osteoarthritis (OA) using in vivo 3 T MRI T2 relaxation time measurements. Methods: Right knee MRI studies of 200 subjects (100 African-American women, and 100 closely matched Caucasian-American women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Knee cartilage was segmented in the patellar (PAT), medial and lateral femoral (MF/LF), and medial and lateral tibial compartments (MT/LT)). Mean T2 relaxation time values per compartment and per whole joint cartilage were generated and analyzed spatially via laminar and grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture methods. Presence and severity of cartilage lesions per compartment were graded using a modified WORMS grading. Statistical analysis employed paired t- and McNemar testing. Results: While African-American women and Caucasian-Americans had similar WORMS cartilage lesion scores (P = 0.970), African-Americans showed significantly lower mean T2 values (~1 ms difference; ~0.5SD) than Caucasian-Americans in the whole knee cartilage (P <0.001), and in the subcompartments (LF: P = 0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.019, MT: P = 0.001) and particularly in the superficial cartilage layer (whole cartilage: P <0.001, LF: P <0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.003, MT: P <0.001). T2 texture parameters were also significantly lower in the whole joint cartilage of African-Americans than in Caucasian-Americans (variance: P = 0.001; contrast: P = 0.018). In analyses limited to matched pairs with no cartilage lesions in a given compartment, T2 values remained significantly lower in African-Americans. Conclusion: Using T2 relaxation time as a biomarker for the cartilage collagen network, our findings suggest racial differences in the biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1595-1604
Number of pages10
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Time measurement
Osteoarthritis
African Americans
Relaxation time
Knee
Chemical analysis
Magnetic resonance imaging
Joints
Textures
Thigh
Biomarkers
Collagen
Statistical methods

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Knee
  • MRI
  • Race
  • T2 relaxation time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Racial differences in biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women with 3 T MR-based T2 relaxation time measurements - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. / Yu, A.; Heilmeier, U.; Kretzschmar, M.; Joseph, G. B.; Liu, F.; Liebl, H.; McCulloch, C. E.; Nevitt, M. C.; Lane, Nancy E; Link, T. M.

In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1595-1604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, A. ; Heilmeier, U. ; Kretzschmar, M. ; Joseph, G. B. ; Liu, F. ; Liebl, H. ; McCulloch, C. E. ; Nevitt, M. C. ; Lane, Nancy E ; Link, T. M. / Racial differences in biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women with 3 T MR-based T2 relaxation time measurements - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 1595-1604.
@article{714cb9d6a5f84e6ca869c0cc60ada440,
title = "Racial differences in biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women with 3 T MR-based T2 relaxation time measurements - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether knee cartilage composition differs between African-American and Caucasian-American women at risk for Osteoarthritis (OA) using in vivo 3 T MRI T2 relaxation time measurements. Methods: Right knee MRI studies of 200 subjects (100 African-American women, and 100 closely matched Caucasian-American women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Knee cartilage was segmented in the patellar (PAT), medial and lateral femoral (MF/LF), and medial and lateral tibial compartments (MT/LT)). Mean T2 relaxation time values per compartment and per whole joint cartilage were generated and analyzed spatially via laminar and grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture methods. Presence and severity of cartilage lesions per compartment were graded using a modified WORMS grading. Statistical analysis employed paired t- and McNemar testing. Results: While African-American women and Caucasian-Americans had similar WORMS cartilage lesion scores (P = 0.970), African-Americans showed significantly lower mean T2 values (~1 ms difference; ~0.5SD) than Caucasian-Americans in the whole knee cartilage (P <0.001), and in the subcompartments (LF: P = 0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.019, MT: P = 0.001) and particularly in the superficial cartilage layer (whole cartilage: P <0.001, LF: P <0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.003, MT: P <0.001). T2 texture parameters were also significantly lower in the whole joint cartilage of African-Americans than in Caucasian-Americans (variance: P = 0.001; contrast: P = 0.018). In analyses limited to matched pairs with no cartilage lesions in a given compartment, T2 values remained significantly lower in African-Americans. Conclusion: Using T2 relaxation time as a biomarker for the cartilage collagen network, our findings suggest racial differences in the biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women.",
keywords = "Cartilage, Knee, MRI, Race, T2 relaxation time",
author = "A. Yu and U. Heilmeier and M. Kretzschmar and Joseph, {G. B.} and F. Liu and H. Liebl and McCulloch, {C. E.} and Nevitt, {M. C.} and Lane, {Nancy E} and Link, {T. M.}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.joca.2015.04.023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "1595--1604",
journal = "Osteoarthritis and Cartilage",
issn = "1063-4584",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial differences in biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women with 3 T MR-based T2 relaxation time measurements - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

AU - Yu, A.

AU - Heilmeier, U.

AU - Kretzschmar, M.

AU - Joseph, G. B.

AU - Liu, F.

AU - Liebl, H.

AU - McCulloch, C. E.

AU - Nevitt, M. C.

AU - Lane, Nancy E

AU - Link, T. M.

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Objective: To determine whether knee cartilage composition differs between African-American and Caucasian-American women at risk for Osteoarthritis (OA) using in vivo 3 T MRI T2 relaxation time measurements. Methods: Right knee MRI studies of 200 subjects (100 African-American women, and 100 closely matched Caucasian-American women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Knee cartilage was segmented in the patellar (PAT), medial and lateral femoral (MF/LF), and medial and lateral tibial compartments (MT/LT)). Mean T2 relaxation time values per compartment and per whole joint cartilage were generated and analyzed spatially via laminar and grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture methods. Presence and severity of cartilage lesions per compartment were graded using a modified WORMS grading. Statistical analysis employed paired t- and McNemar testing. Results: While African-American women and Caucasian-Americans had similar WORMS cartilage lesion scores (P = 0.970), African-Americans showed significantly lower mean T2 values (~1 ms difference; ~0.5SD) than Caucasian-Americans in the whole knee cartilage (P <0.001), and in the subcompartments (LF: P = 0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.019, MT: P = 0.001) and particularly in the superficial cartilage layer (whole cartilage: P <0.001, LF: P <0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.003, MT: P <0.001). T2 texture parameters were also significantly lower in the whole joint cartilage of African-Americans than in Caucasian-Americans (variance: P = 0.001; contrast: P = 0.018). In analyses limited to matched pairs with no cartilage lesions in a given compartment, T2 values remained significantly lower in African-Americans. Conclusion: Using T2 relaxation time as a biomarker for the cartilage collagen network, our findings suggest racial differences in the biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women.

AB - Objective: To determine whether knee cartilage composition differs between African-American and Caucasian-American women at risk for Osteoarthritis (OA) using in vivo 3 T MRI T2 relaxation time measurements. Methods: Right knee MRI studies of 200 subjects (100 African-American women, and 100 closely matched Caucasian-American women) were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Knee cartilage was segmented in the patellar (PAT), medial and lateral femoral (MF/LF), and medial and lateral tibial compartments (MT/LT)). Mean T2 relaxation time values per compartment and per whole joint cartilage were generated and analyzed spatially via laminar and grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture methods. Presence and severity of cartilage lesions per compartment were graded using a modified WORMS grading. Statistical analysis employed paired t- and McNemar testing. Results: While African-American women and Caucasian-Americans had similar WORMS cartilage lesion scores (P = 0.970), African-Americans showed significantly lower mean T2 values (~1 ms difference; ~0.5SD) than Caucasian-Americans in the whole knee cartilage (P <0.001), and in the subcompartments (LF: P = 0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.019, MT: P = 0.001) and particularly in the superficial cartilage layer (whole cartilage: P <0.001, LF: P <0.001, MF: P <0.001, LT: P = 0.003, MT: P <0.001). T2 texture parameters were also significantly lower in the whole joint cartilage of African-Americans than in Caucasian-Americans (variance: P = 0.001; contrast: P = 0.018). In analyses limited to matched pairs with no cartilage lesions in a given compartment, T2 values remained significantly lower in African-Americans. Conclusion: Using T2 relaxation time as a biomarker for the cartilage collagen network, our findings suggest racial differences in the biochemical knee cartilage composition between African-American and Caucasian-American women.

KW - Cartilage

KW - Knee

KW - MRI

KW - Race

KW - T2 relaxation time

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940447177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940447177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2015.04.023

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2015.04.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 25937026

AN - SCOPUS:84940447177

VL - 23

SP - 1595

EP - 1604

JO - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

JF - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

SN - 1063-4584

IS - 9

ER -