Racial and/or Ethnic Differences in Formal Sex Education and Sex Education by Parents among Young Women in the United States

Rachel H. Vanderberg, Amy H. Farkas, Elizabeth Miller, Gina S. Sucato, Aletha Y. Akers, Sonya B. Borrero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objective: We sought to investigate the associations between race and/or ethnicity and young women's formal sex education and sex education by parents. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of 1768 women aged 15-24 years who participated in the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: We assessed 6 main outcomes: participants' report of: (1) any formal sex education; (2) formal contraceptive education; (3) formal sexually transmitted infection (STI) education; (4) any sex education by parents; (5) contraceptive education by parents; and (6) STI education by parents. The primary independent variable was self-reported race and/or ethnicity. Results: Nearly all of participants (95%) reported any formal sex education, 68% reported formal contraceptive education, and 92% reported formal STI education. Seventy-five percent of participants reported not having any sex education by parents and only 61% and 56% reported contraceptive and STI education by parents, respectively. US-born Hispanic women were more likely than white women to report STI education by parents (adjusted odds ratio = 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.99). No other significant racial and/or ethnic differences in sex education were found. Conclusion: There are few racial and/or ethnic differences in formal sex education and sex education by parents among young women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-73
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Disparities
  • Parents
  • Race
  • Sex education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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