Quantitative lipid metabolomic changes in alcoholic micropigs with fatty liver disease

Angela M. Zivkovic, J. Bruce German, Farah Esfandiari, Charles H. Halsted

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic ethanol consumption coupled with folate deficiency leads to rapid liver fat accumulation and progression to alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH). However, the specific effects of alcohol on key liver lipid metabolic pathways involved in fat accumulation are unknown. It is unclear whether lipid synthesis, lipid export, or a combination of both is contributing to hepatic steatosis in ASH. Methods: In this study we estimated the flux of fatty acids (FA) through the stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT), and FA elongation pathways in relation to liver triacylglycerol (TG) content in Yucatan micropigs fed a 40% ethanol folate-deficient diet with or without supplementation with S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) compared with controls. Flux through the SCD and PEMT pathways was used to assess the contribution of lipid synthesis and lipid export respectively on the accumulation of fat in the liver. Liver FA composition within TG, cholesterol ester (CE), phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine classes was quantified by gas chromatography. Results: Alcoholic pigs had increased liver TG content relative to controls, accompanied by increased flux through the SCD pathway as indicated by increases in the ratios of 16:1n7 to 16:0 and 18:1n9 to 18:0. Conversely, flux through the elongation and PEMT pathways was suppressed by alcohol, as indicated by multiple metabolite ratios. SAM supplementation attenuated the TG accumulation associated with alcohol. Conclusions: These data provide an in vivo examination of liver lipid metabolic pathways confirming that both increased de novo lipogenesis (e.g., lipid synthesis) and altered phospholipid metabolism (e.g., lipid export) contribute to the excessive accumulation of lipids in liver affected by ASH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-758
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

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Metabolomics
Fatty Liver
Liver
Liver Diseases
Lipids
Phosphatidylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase
Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase
Alcoholic Fatty Liver
Triglycerides
Fluxes
Fatty Acids
Fats
Alcohols
Folic Acid
Methionine
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Elongation
Ethanol
Cholesterol Esters
Lipogenesis

Keywords

  • Alcoholic Steatohepatitis
  • Lipid Metabolism
  • Pathway Flux Analysis
  • Quantitative Lipid Profiling
  • Targeted Metabolomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Quantitative lipid metabolomic changes in alcoholic micropigs with fatty liver disease. / Zivkovic, Angela M.; Bruce German, J.; Esfandiari, Farah; Halsted, Charles H.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 33, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 751-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zivkovic, Angela M. ; Bruce German, J. ; Esfandiari, Farah ; Halsted, Charles H. / Quantitative lipid metabolomic changes in alcoholic micropigs with fatty liver disease. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2009 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 751-758.
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