Quantitative genetic analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using epistatic miniarray profiles (E-MAPs) and its application to chromatin functions

M. Schuldiner, Sean Collins, J. S. Weissman, N. J. Krogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a simple eukaryotic model system for the study of chromatin assembly and regulation has allowed rapid discovery of genes that influence this complex process. The functions of many of the proteins encoded by these genes have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe a high-throughput methodology that can be used to illuminate gene function and discuss its application to a set of genes involved in the creation, maintenance and remodeling of chromatin structure. Our technique, termed E-MAPs, involves the generation of quantitative genetic interaction maps that reveal the function and organization of cellular proteins and networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-352
Number of pages9
JournalMethods
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly
Yeast
Chromatin
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Genes
Saccharomycetales
Genetic Association Studies
Proteins
Maintenance
Throughput

Keywords

  • Chromatin
  • DAmP
  • E-MAP
  • Epistasis
  • Genetic interactions
  • Quantitative
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Quantitative genetic analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using epistatic miniarray profiles (E-MAPs) and its application to chromatin functions. / Schuldiner, M.; Collins, Sean; Weissman, J. S.; Krogan, N. J.

In: Methods, Vol. 40, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 344-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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