Quantitative assessment of blood volume, blood flow, and permeability of the brain of clinically normal dogs by use of dynamic contrast- enhanced computed tomography

Kristi L. Peterson, Alexander G. MacLeod, Erik R Wisner, Richard E. Larson, Rachel E Pollard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine effects of regional variation, interobserver variability, and vessel selection on quantitative vascular variables derived by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) of the brain of clinically normal dogs. Animals - 14 adult dogs with no evidence of CNS dysfunction. Procedures - Dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups, and DCE-CT was performed at the level of the frontal lobe, rostral portion of the parietal-temporal lobes, caudal portions of the parietal-temporal lobes, or occipital lobe-cerebellum for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability in gray and white matter for both a large and small artery were calculated and compared. Values among 3 observers and 4 regions of the brain were calculated and compared. Results - Significant interobserver variability was detected for CBF and permeability in white matter. Values calculated for large and small arteries were correlated for CBV and CBF but not for permeability. Overall mean ± SD for CBF, CBV, and permeability in gray matter was 53.5 ± 277 mL/min/100 g, 2.9 ± 1.4 mL/100 g, and 1.4 ± 2.2 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Mean for CBF CBV, and permeability in white matter was 44.2 ± 28.5 mL/mm/100 g, 2.5 ± 1.5 mL/100 g, and 0.9 ± 0.7 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Values did not differ significantly among brain regions. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Significant regional variations were not detected for quantitative vascular variables in the brain of clinically normal dogs. However, interobserver variability and vessel selection have an important role in variable estimation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-50
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
blood volume
Blood Volume
computed tomography
blood flow
Permeability
permeability
Tomography
Observer Variation
Dogs
brain
dogs
Brain
Parietal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
blood vessels
arteries
Blood Vessels
Arteries
Occipital Lobe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{e6766979de174a8baded6b8b0049762f,
title = "Quantitative assessment of blood volume, blood flow, and permeability of the brain of clinically normal dogs by use of dynamic contrast- enhanced computed tomography",
abstract = "Objective - To determine effects of regional variation, interobserver variability, and vessel selection on quantitative vascular variables derived by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) of the brain of clinically normal dogs. Animals - 14 adult dogs with no evidence of CNS dysfunction. Procedures - Dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups, and DCE-CT was performed at the level of the frontal lobe, rostral portion of the parietal-temporal lobes, caudal portions of the parietal-temporal lobes, or occipital lobe-cerebellum for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability in gray and white matter for both a large and small artery were calculated and compared. Values among 3 observers and 4 regions of the brain were calculated and compared. Results - Significant interobserver variability was detected for CBF and permeability in white matter. Values calculated for large and small arteries were correlated for CBV and CBF but not for permeability. Overall mean ± SD for CBF, CBV, and permeability in gray matter was 53.5 ± 277 mL/min/100 g, 2.9 ± 1.4 mL/100 g, and 1.4 ± 2.2 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Mean for CBF CBV, and permeability in white matter was 44.2 ± 28.5 mL/mm/100 g, 2.5 ± 1.5 mL/100 g, and 0.9 ± 0.7 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Values did not differ significantly among brain regions. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Significant regional variations were not detected for quantitative vascular variables in the brain of clinically normal dogs. However, interobserver variability and vessel selection have an important role in variable estimation.",
author = "Peterson, {Kristi L.} and MacLeod, {Alexander G.} and Wisner, {Erik R} and Larson, {Richard E.} and Pollard, {Rachel E}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
doi = "10.2460/ajvr.69.1.45",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "45--50",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantitative assessment of blood volume, blood flow, and permeability of the brain of clinically normal dogs by use of dynamic contrast- enhanced computed tomography

AU - Peterson, Kristi L.

AU - MacLeod, Alexander G.

AU - Wisner, Erik R

AU - Larson, Richard E.

AU - Pollard, Rachel E

PY - 2008/1

Y1 - 2008/1

N2 - Objective - To determine effects of regional variation, interobserver variability, and vessel selection on quantitative vascular variables derived by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) of the brain of clinically normal dogs. Animals - 14 adult dogs with no evidence of CNS dysfunction. Procedures - Dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups, and DCE-CT was performed at the level of the frontal lobe, rostral portion of the parietal-temporal lobes, caudal portions of the parietal-temporal lobes, or occipital lobe-cerebellum for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability in gray and white matter for both a large and small artery were calculated and compared. Values among 3 observers and 4 regions of the brain were calculated and compared. Results - Significant interobserver variability was detected for CBF and permeability in white matter. Values calculated for large and small arteries were correlated for CBV and CBF but not for permeability. Overall mean ± SD for CBF, CBV, and permeability in gray matter was 53.5 ± 277 mL/min/100 g, 2.9 ± 1.4 mL/100 g, and 1.4 ± 2.2 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Mean for CBF CBV, and permeability in white matter was 44.2 ± 28.5 mL/mm/100 g, 2.5 ± 1.5 mL/100 g, and 0.9 ± 0.7 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Values did not differ significantly among brain regions. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Significant regional variations were not detected for quantitative vascular variables in the brain of clinically normal dogs. However, interobserver variability and vessel selection have an important role in variable estimation.

AB - Objective - To determine effects of regional variation, interobserver variability, and vessel selection on quantitative vascular variables derived by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) of the brain of clinically normal dogs. Animals - 14 adult dogs with no evidence of CNS dysfunction. Procedures - Dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups, and DCE-CT was performed at the level of the frontal lobe, rostral portion of the parietal-temporal lobes, caudal portions of the parietal-temporal lobes, or occipital lobe-cerebellum for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability in gray and white matter for both a large and small artery were calculated and compared. Values among 3 observers and 4 regions of the brain were calculated and compared. Results - Significant interobserver variability was detected for CBF and permeability in white matter. Values calculated for large and small arteries were correlated for CBV and CBF but not for permeability. Overall mean ± SD for CBF, CBV, and permeability in gray matter was 53.5 ± 277 mL/min/100 g, 2.9 ± 1.4 mL/100 g, and 1.4 ± 2.2 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Mean for CBF CBV, and permeability in white matter was 44.2 ± 28.5 mL/mm/100 g, 2.5 ± 1.5 mL/100 g, and 0.9 ± 0.7 mL/min/100 g, respectively. Values did not differ significantly among brain regions. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Significant regional variations were not detected for quantitative vascular variables in the brain of clinically normal dogs. However, interobserver variability and vessel selection have an important role in variable estimation.

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