Quantifying federal funding and scholarly output related to the academic emergency medicine consensus conferences

Daniel Nishijima, Tu Dinh, Larissa S May, Kabir Yadav, Gary M. Gaddis, David C. Cone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Every year since 2000, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) has presented a one-day consensus conference to generate a research agenda for advancement of a scientific topic. One of the 12 annual issues of AEM is reserved for the proceedings of these conferences. The purpose of this study was to measure academic productivity of these conferences by evaluating subsequent federal research funding received by authors of conference manuscripts and calculating citation counts of conference papers. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. In 2012, the NIH RePORTER system was searched to identify subsequent federal funding obtained by authors of the consensus conference issues from 2000 to 2010. Funded projects were coded as related or unrelated to conference topic. Citation counts for all conference manuscripts were quantified using Scopus and Google Scholar. Simple descriptive statistics were reported. RESULTS: Eight hundred fifty-two individual authors contributed to 280 papers published in the 11 consensus conference issues. One hundred thirty-seven authors (16%) obtained funding for 318 projects. A median of 22 topic-related projects per conference (range 10-97) accounted for a median of $20,488,331 per conference (range $7,779,512 to $122,918,205). The average (± SD) number of citations per paper was 15.7 ± 20.5 in Scopus and 23.7 ± 32.6 in Google Scholar. CONCLUSIONS: The authors of consensus conference manuscripts obtained significant federal grant support for follow-up research related to conference themes. In addition, the manuscripts generated by these conferences were frequently cited. Conferences devoted to research agenda development appear to be an academically worthwhile endeavor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-181
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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Emergency Medicine
funding
medicine
Manuscripts
Research
search engine
Organized Financing
descriptive statistics
cross-sectional study
grant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Quantifying federal funding and scholarly output related to the academic emergency medicine consensus conferences. / Nishijima, Daniel; Dinh, Tu; May, Larissa S; Yadav, Kabir; Gaddis, Gary M.; Cone, David C.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 89, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 176-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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